Course Descriptions

Academic Year 2018-2019 Bulletin

Undergraduate Courses

ENG 104 First Year Composition Stretch I (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Directed Self-Placement must be completed prior to enrollment.

Critical thinking skills in reading and writing. Emphasis on academic argumentation, working with and evaluating sources, conducting research and using rhetorical approaches. (ABC/NC grading, CR/NC allowed) 
(Note: Successful completion of 104 and 105 will culminate in satisfying the Written English Composition I requirement (GE Area A2). The minimum grade for satisfying the requirement in Area A2 is a C-.)

ENG 114 First Year Composition (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Must complete Directed Self-Placement prior to enrollment or see Written English Requirements section of this Bulletin for other eligibility criteria.

Critical thinking skills in reading and writing. Emphasis on academic argumentation, working with and evaluating sources, conducting research and using a variety of rhetorical approaches. (ABC/NC grading, CR/NC allowed) 
(Note: For this course to satisfy General Education, students must earn a C- or CR or higher grade if taken fall 2014 or later.)

Course Attributes: A2: Written English Comm I

Beginning in Fall 2017, three formats of ENG 114 are available:

  • Traditional classroom sections geared towards students who learn best by actively interacting with peers/instructor in person, and those who prefer a range of interactive class activities to them understand course content and assignment requirements.
  • Hybrid sections which meet less frequently during the week but require more self-directed online work. These sections are appropriate for motivated, independent students with the sufficient self-discipline to manage their own workload and regular assignments on a weekly basis. To register for hybrid sections, search for "hybrid" under Course Attributes.
  • Community Service Learning sections which integrate academic concepts and service work in the community. These sections are geared towards students who want an active, real-world learning experience focused on learning from and with community partners. To register for hybrid sections, search for "service learning" under Course Attributes.
    • Connect with Your Community: English 114, sections 68 and 69 Explore your new world at SF State by becoming a part of a rich and invigorating academic community in English 114 sections 54 and 69. Learn about and connect with the SF State community to deepen your experiences inside of and beyond the classroom. Extend your community into SF by participating in twenty hours of service learning in an approved organization near SFSU or beyond. We will become familiar with campus resources, opportunities, departments, and approved organizations through researching, reading, thinking, discussing, writing and revising. This course supports students’ academic goals, helps them understand their value to their new communities, and builds their academic identity and success through engagement. Join this extraordinary adventure into your future!
    • Place and Planet: English 114, sections 70, 71, and 72 Experience change in a new writing course where you can make a difference! Engage in twenty hours of service in organizations like SF Environment, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, SF Bicycle Coalition, Education Outside and others. Complement this practical experience with readings, visual media, discussions and writing about things we love: oceans and rivers, air and animals . . . hiking, parks, travel. We’ll look into the past, examine the present and speculate about the future. Join an adventure where mind and body both get a workout!

ENG 214 Second Year Written Composition: English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114; or equivalent with grade of CR or C- or better. 

Flexible reading and writing skills for academic inquiry and for engaging with social issues; varied composing and revising skills; critical analysis and self-reflection, with special attention to rhetorical variation; fine-tuning research. (Plus/minus ABC/NC, CR/NC allowed) [CSL may be available]

Course Attributes: A4: Written English Comm II

Detailed Information:

Second Year Composition emphasizes developing more flexibility in your reading and writing practices so that you can successfully tackle a wide range of writing situations or tasks. The course helps you to develop more advanced research skills, to practice responding to a wider variety of ideas and perspectives, and to create more sophisticated academic arguments in your writing. By practicing academic argumentation and inquiry and engaging with real-world issues, students will create varied, rhetorically-aware compositions. To develop responsible positions, students fine-tune their research skills, evaluating scholarly and non-scholarly sources and incorporating a variety of perspectives.

Beginning in Fall 2017, four formats of ENG 214 are available:

  • Traditional classroom sections geared towards students who learn best by actively interacting with peers/instructor in person, and those who prefer a range of interactive class activities to them understand course content and assignment requirements.
  • Hybrid sections which meet less frequently during the week but require more self-directed online work. These sections are appropriate for motivated, independent students with the sufficient self-discipline to manage their own workload and regular assignments on a weekly basis. To register for hybrid sections, search for "hybrid" under Course Attributes.
  • Community Service Learning sections which integrate academic concepts and service work in the community. These sections are geared towards students who want an active, real-world learning experience focused on learning from and with community partners. To register for hybrid sections, search for "service learning" under Course Attributes.
    • Language in Action: ENG 214, Sections 37 and 38 Looking for a college writing class that lets you decide what topics are relevant? Do you wish writing assignments had more to do with life outside of class? In English 214.37 and 38, students decide what’s important enough to write about, think about, and even do something about. Focus on an environmental or social justice issue and earn a minimum of 20 optional community service learning hours reflected in your SFSU transcript and resume. Whatever your interest – it has a social justice component. See a problem, a need? English 214.37 and 38 will help you explore a solution, a course of action, with the option of engaging with a local community and earning service learning credit as you do it.
    • The Self, Environment, and Society: English 214, Sections 39 and 40 As education theorist John Dewey argues, “the self is not something ready-made, but something in continuous formation through choice of action.” These Service-Learning ENG 214 sections will thus explore the formation of self in many ways, including how you envision the self in relationship to your major, the self as an entity within the construct of society, and the interrelation of self and the environment.
    • Words and Action: ENG 214, Sections 41 and 42 Concerned about prejudice, poverty, homelessness, police violence? Want equal opportunity for all and better care for “the other”? Join English 214, Words and Action. We will look at contemporary issues of inequity, combining reading and writing with 20 hours of work in an approved organization working toward social justice. Service options include helping low-income youth, homeless adults, refugees. Write and work for a better world.
  • Fully Online Sections  require the most self-discipline, motivation, and independence. Students should be able to meet multiple weekly deadlines through advanced time management skills and be comfortable with technology, asking questions, and collaborating in online environments. To register, search for "fully online" sections under Course Attributes.

ENG 418 Grammar for Writers (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or equivalent

Focus on students' proofreading, editing, and revising their writing for academic courses. Analyze samples of writing in their disciplines to define and develop effective sentences and paragraphs. Open to all majors.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities

Section 01 – John Holland | Detailed Information:

Ever wonder why your writing doesn't seem to "flow"? Have teachers told you that your sentences seem choppy, confusing, or too simple? English 418 is a course for students who want to learn how to construct sophisticated, professional sentences. Using samples of student writing from across the disciplines, we will learn to identify common errors, develop techniques for constructing a variety of sentence structures, and focus on improving cohesion and coherence in your writing. This course will teach you how to write polished, grammatically complex sentences, and most importantly, give you confidence in your ability to express your ideas correctly and with style. I surmise that most of you have never studied formal rules and conventions of English grammar before. You'll need to start the course by learning some names and terms we use to talk about sentence structure. I recognize that these terms are unfamiliar and difficult to learn. But these early difficulties will pay off later in the course when we all have a common language to talk about our writing.

English 418 is an undergraduate general education course. In a typical semester, the vast majority of students are either Creative Writing or English Literature majors with other students representing Cinema, Journalism, Photojournalism, English Education, Business, STEM and usually 2-3 Composition graduate students, for which the course is an optional requirement toward their degree.

ENG 417 Academic Literacy and the Urban Adolescent (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Restricted to English majors; ENG 214, or equivalent.

Service Learning, focusing on the acquisition of academic literacy by urban teens; requires 25 hours volunteering in middle or high school classrooms. Partly satisfies Early Field Experience requirement for Single Subject Credential Program. [CSL may be available]

Course Attributes: Social Justice

Section 01 – James Gilligan | Detailed Information:

ENG 419 Advanced Composition for Teachers (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: English majors; ENG 214, or equivalent.

The composing process: purpose, audience, types of discourse, rhetorical strategies, syntactic structures, response groups. Partly satisfies Early Field Experience requirement for Single Subject Credential. Service Learning requires 20 hours tutoring in secondary Language Arts classes. [CSL may be available]

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information:

ENG 655 Literature and the Adolescent Reader (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or equivalent.

Analysis and evaluation of literature about and for adolescents. Teaching approach based on reader response theory. Required for students completing the Single Subject Waiver in English.

Course Attributes: Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information:  Two central purposes inform this course—to help students develop a broad familiarity with the genre of young adult literature (a very broad genre, it must be admitted) and to consider the teaching of literature to adolescents. While students do not have to plan to teach in order to take this course, questions about adolescent literacy, adolescent development, and pedagogy will resonate through the class. In particular, we will explore the following important questions: Who are adolescents? Why should adolescents read? How do the ways we teach reading influence the meaning students make from literature? What should adolescents read in school? Although these questions are especially relevant for future teachers, they fit into the larger context of English studies as well. Questions about the nature of literature, the characteristics that define literary value and quality, and the impact of different theoretical, critical and cultural approaches on meaning-making are central to the study of literature.

ENG 688 Assessment in English Language Arts (Unit: 1)

Prerequisites: Senior standing and interview with English Single Subject Credential adviser. Creation of an English Education e-Portfolio to demonstrate mastery of subject matter competency in English.

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information:

 

ENG 122 Evolution fo Language in the Digital Age (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: n/a

Examination of language patterns and linguistics structure of local and global online and digital communications.

Course Attributes: D1: Social Science

Section 01 – Jenny Lederer | Detailed Information:

ENG 420 Introduction to the Study of Language (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or equivalent.

Linguistic investigation of sounds, words, sentences, conversations. Relationships between language, culture, dialects, mind, animal communication examined. Recommended as first language structure course.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Global Perspectives

Section 01 – Jenny Lederer | Detailed Information:

ENG 421 SYNTAX (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or ENG 420 priority to English majors, minors, and MA TESOL and Linguistics students. 

Introduction to contemporary syntactic theory and fundamentals of linguistic data analysis.

Section 01 – Anastasia Smirnova | Detailed Information: This is not a grammar class. Rather than learning proper punctuation and whether to split innitives, the study of syntax is concerned with explaining why native speakers have strong intuitions about what sounds \right." Traditional grammar classes may teach us not to end sentences with prepositions, but they do not need to warn against constructions like What do you like the man who sells? 1 Why not? Because we already know not to use them. Syntax is the study of why native speakers accept certain constructions as acceptable and reject others. What is the underlying structure that guides sentence formation in the world's languages? Linguists aim to nd the commonalities that unite human languages, and discover systematicities in the differences that divide them.

ENG 423 Language Analysis for Language Teachers (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or ENG 420.

Introduction to English language structures and common English learner errors. Analysis of form, meaning and use in spoken and written texts, including academic genres. Focus on understanding cross-linguistic influences and strategies for responding to learner challenges in grammar and pronunciation.

Section 01 – David Olsher | Detailed Information:

ENG 424 Phonology and Morphology (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or ENG 420; priority to English majors, minors, MA Linguistics, and TESOL students.

Theories and techniques of phonological and morphological analysis using data from English and other languages.

Section 01 – Clare Sandy| Detailed Information:

ENG 425 Language in Context (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or ENG 420; priority to English majors, minors, MA Linguistics, and TESOL students.

Introduction to language variation relating to age, ethnicity, gender, region, class, occupation; language and culture; multilingualism. [CSL may be available]

Section 01 – Clare Sandy | Detailed Information:

Section 02 – Clare Sandy | Detailed Information:

ENG 426 Second Language Acquisition (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in a foreign language required.

Survey of research and issues in second language acquisition. Required for entrance into M.A. TESOL program. Recommended for ESL/EFL and foreign language teachers and credential candidates.

Section 01 ‐ Robert Kohls | Detailed Information:

ENG 620 Introduction to Computational Linguistics (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or consent of instructor.

Introduction to linguistic analysis of digital texts. Students learn to write programs in Python and to process raw texts (tokenization), discover statistical patterns in linguistic data (frequency distribution), perform part-of-speech tagging, text segmentation, and classification.

Section 01 ‐ Anastasia Smirnova | Detailed Information:

ENG 670 Writing for Graduate Studies in the Liberal and Creative Arts (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or application in progress, or consent of instructor. Registration priority will be given to students enrolled in graduate programs in the College of Liberal and Creative Arts.

Development of writing skills for graduate work in the Liberal and Creative Arts, focusing on the kinds of writing needed in these disciplines. May not be used for master's degree ATC requirements.

Section 01 – Andrea Kevech | Detailed Information:

ENG 231 Shakespeare on Film (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or consent of instructor.

Examination of selected Shakespearean plays as well as significant film and video adaptations. Extensive work with Shakespeare's language in both comedies and tragedies. Detailed analysis of cinematic conventions and innovations in the best of Shakespeare on film.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information:

ENG 240 Heroes and Antiheroes in Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or consent of instructor.

Examination of archetypes of heroes and antiheroes in English language literature. Detailed analysis of identity, power, hierarchy, and privilege in complex literature, primarily from the 16th-20th centuries.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information:

ENG 241 The Good Life: Literature and the Pursuit of Happiness (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or consent of instructor.

Focus on enduring concern in literature: the definition of a life of meaning and happiness--The Good Life. Examination of how texts from ancient civilizations through the present both mirror and shape morality, materialism, pleasure, and purpose in English tradition.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Summer Star | Detailed Information:

ENG 250 The Study of Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 114, or consent of instructor.

Methods and principles for close reading literature in major genres, especially fiction, drama, and poetry. Examination and analysis of a wide variety of literary styles in works from a diverse range of both major and lesser-known writers. [Formerly ENG 150]

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information:

ENG 252 The Novel in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or consent of instructor.

Major English and American novelists and variations in the genre between Defoe and the present.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information:In this general introduction to the novel in English, we will read well-known and new works by E.M. Forster, Toni Morrison, Jeffrey Eugenides, and Michael Ondaatje. This is a GE class.

ENG 258 American Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or consent of instructor.

Selected masterpieces of American literature.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Lawrence Hanley | Detailed Information: This course surveys some of the key figures, movements, and texts of 19th and 20th-century American literature. To tame this profusion of words and stories, our loose focus will be on the city and urban experience in American poetry, fiction, and drama. Some of the writers we’ll read include: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Stephen Crane, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Dashiell Hammett, Arthur Miller, Allen Ginsberg, the Nuyorican Poets Café, and Karen Tei Yamashita. Grading will favor consistent, authentic, and reflective engagement with the texts we read. There will be no midterm or final essays - - but there will be plenty of regular, shorter writing assignments and some quizzes.

ENG 259 Introduction to Shakespeare (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114, or consent of instructor.

For potential English majors unacquainted with Shakespeare's work and non-majors not yet conscious of themselves as heirs of Shakespeare's language and culture, and beneficiaries of his dramatic gifts.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information: Course texts: Julius Caesar, The Merchant of Venice, Macbeth, Hamlet, Othello. The course texts will occasionally be supplemented with audio recordings and videocassette tapes of Shakespeare's plays and lyrics. There will be some handouts of poetry and literary criticism related to Shakespearean drama. Some of the poetry will be only poets and dramatists of the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods.

ENG 460 Literature in English I: Beginnings through the 17th Century (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Introduction to the history and aesthetics of influential Old English, Middle English, sixteenth- and seventeenth-century texts written in England and America.

Section 01 – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information:

ENG 461 Literature in English II: 18th and 19th Centuries (Units: 3)

Prerequisite:ENG 214, or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Introduction to the history and aesthetics of influential eighteenth- and nineteenth-century texts written in England and America.

Section 01 – Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information:

ENG 462 Literature in English III: The Twentieth Century (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Survey of key texts, debates, and literary historical landmarks in the study of twentieth-century literature in English.

Section 01 – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information:

Section 01 – Kathleen DeGuzman | Detailed Information:

ENG 465 Post-Apocalyptic Science Fiction (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Examination of how post-apocalyptic narratives in mid to late 20th century science fiction reflect cultural anxieties, explore ethical dilemmas, and propose a variety of dystopian and utopian solutions to the threat of rapid social, political, and environmental change.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Environmental Sustainability (ES)

Section 01 – Meg Schoerke | Detailed Information:

ENG 480GW Junior Seminar - GWAR (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Restricted to English major and minor; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. (English major must complete ENG 480GW before the end of the junior year.)

Practical criticism; techniques in the art of reading literature and writing about it in a series of short papers. Majors must complete this course before the end of the junior year. (ABC/NC grading only)

Course Attributes: Graduation Writing Assessment

Section 01 – Angela Jones | Detailed Information:

Section 02 – Mary Soliday | Detailed Information: English 480: Junior Seminar introduces English majors to the habits of mind typical of English Studies; and it fulfills the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). To accomplish both aims, this section of 480 will focus on ways of reading and writing. Analysis is only one mode of reading and writing: we will consider other pleasurable modes as well, including an emphasis on integrating what you are learning in other English classes into this one. We’ll spend part of the semester reading a long novel, and the rest on reading poetry; you will choose most of the poems we read, and some will be performed. You’ll write short pieces every week, and these will form the basis of class discussion; several classes will be devoted to writers’ workshops, where you will, among other things, select a weekly piece to develop into a culminating, and creative, essay that richly interprets a literary text in your own, genuine voice. Required texts at the SF State Bookstore include the Broadview edition of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles and a poetry anthology.

Section 03 – Sara Hackenberg | Detailed Information:

ENG 495 Digital Humanities and Literacies (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Introduction to topics, issues, practices, and tools to develop a critical engagement with digital culture, with special focus on reading, writing, and understanding literature in the digital age.

Section 01 – Lawrence Hanley | Detailed Information:

ENG 503 Studies in Medieval Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, work, or issue in Medieval literature. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Julie Paulson | Detailed Information: The sixteenth-century Scottish poet Gavin Douglas famously wrote that Chaucer “was ever, God wait, wemenis frend” (“was ever, God knows, a friend to women”). Chaucer and “the woman question”—how Chaucer thought about the role and nature of women—has been of abiding interest to his readers. In this course, we will read some of Chaucer’s most famous works with a focus on how he represented women, gender issues and stereotypes, and power relations between men and women. In doing so, the course will also introduce students to the social, cultural, political, and religious contexts of Chaucer’s writing; familiarize students with literary critical approaches to Chaucer’s poetry, especially feminist ones; and develop students’ research, critical thinking, and writing skills.

ENG 525 Studies in American Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, work, or issue in American literature. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 –Meg Schoerke | Detailed Information:

ENG 526 Age of the American Renaissance: 1830-1860 (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Achievement of a national literature in the works of such writers as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Frederick Douglass, with reading of earlier authors.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities, Social Justice

Section 01 – Meg Schoerke | Detailed Information:

ENG 527 American Literature: 1860-1914 (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Major American writing from romanticism to realism and naturalism: Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Kate Chopin, Henry Adams, Edwin Arlington Robinson, Edith Wharton, and Theodore Dreiser.

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information:

ENG 535 Literature and Ecology (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

An appraisal of literary works in light of their representation of nature and their ecological wisdom. Examples of post-romantic American literature of nature. The theory and practice of ecocriticism.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Environmental Sustainability

Section 01 – Angela Jones | Detailed Information:

ENG 550 The Rise of the Novel (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Emergence of the English novel in the work of such writers as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Smollett; the relationship of the new genre to changes in social and philosophical experience.

Section 01 – Sara Hackenberg | Detailed Information:

ENG 554 Modern American Novel (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or consent of instructor.

Major novelists from Dreiser through Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner to the present.

Section 01 – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information:

ENG 565 The Short Story: Global Literature in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

The short story as a distinctive literary phenomenon of global literature in English, examined in relation to cultural perspectives and literary-historical traditions.

Course Attributes: Global Perspectives

Section 01 – Geoffrey Green | Detailed Information: The course will be a mix of lecture and discussion. We will necessarily talk about the relationship between historical events, different cultural perspectives, and the short story form in global literature in English. Using short stories from a variety of cultures, traditions, perspectives, and literary styles, we will explore the uniqueness of cultural difference as well as the transcendence of general human qualities across cultures, time, and tradition. Paper, midterm, and final exam.

ENG 571 Shakespeare's Rivals (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Close study of the drama of Shakespeare's contemporaries and immediate successors. Class will combine modes of literary analysis with theatrically-informed approaches.

Section 01 – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information:

ENG 580 Individual Authors (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Rotating course on a specific author, or group of authors, in British, American, or Global literatures of any period. Topic to be specified in the Class Schedule. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Section 01 – Summer Star | Detailed Information:

ENG 583 Shakespeare: Representative Plays (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Shakespeare and his age; his development as a dramatist and his literary, intellectual, and social milieu. Reading of representative comedies, histories, and tragedies as well as some non-dramatic poetry.

Course Attributes: E1: Lifelong Learning Develop

Section 01 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information: This course is designed to introduce students to a range of representative plays—comedies, tragedies, romances and ‘problem plays’—from the Shakespearean corpus. Through close readings (and occasional film screenings) of representative plays, we will explore a range of topics related to Shakespearean drama. In the course of the semester, we will acquaint ourselves with the society and culture in which these plays were created, the theatrical context in which they were performed, and the historical processes by which they have come down to us. Some of the following questions will inform our discussions: How is gender negotiated on the Shakespearean stage? How is religious difference performed? How is the body subject to discipline and punishment? How are representations of the body linked with emerging discourses of nationhood, race, class, and sexuality in early modern England? Plays will include The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Othello, and The Tempest.

ENG 584 Shakespeare: Selected Plays (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Study of a few plays in relation to the textual problems, dramatic technique, and problems of interpretation. Analysis of language, imagery, and structure.

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information:

ENG 611 Modern Criticism (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Examination of critical approaches including the formalist and the psychoanalytic. Application of one or more critical methods to works of imaginative literature.

Section 01 – Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information: Through a close reading of selected texts in literature and criticism, we will examine how the phenomenon of "literature" and the notion of "literariness" have been defined and characterized in modern times. Among the topics we will be exploring together: the relationships between literature and history, literature and ethics, literature and politics; the ontology of the literary work; the debates over canonization; the polemic over feminist criticism and cultural criticism; the responsibility of the intellectual as literary scholar, critic, and teacher.

ENG 614 Women in Literature: Authors and Characters (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, or issue focused on literature and/or criticism by women writers of any period. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information:

ENG 630 Selected Studies (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, or issue in literature from a variety of national traditions and/or historical periods. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Geoffrey Green | Detailed Information:

ENG 631 Post-Colonial Literature in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Contemporary literature in English by writers from former Third World colonies.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Global Perspectives

Section 01 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information: This course explores the myriad forms of self-fashioning delineated in the postcolonial novel. What are the forces—historical, cultural, and political—that shape postcolonial identities in all their complexities? How are these identities inflected in terms of gender, class, and ethnicity? Through an examination of works by a range of postcolonial writers, we will engage with the literary representation, mediation, and construction of these identities. We will especially consider issues related to the legacy of colonialism, the shadow of nationalism, the search for roots and routes, and the complex nature of postcolonial modernities, as they are dealt with in these works. Authors covered in the course will include Salman Rushdie, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Jamaica Kincaid, Jhumpa Lahiri, Julia Alvarez, and Mohsin Hamid.

ENG 632 The Literature of Exile and Migration (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Investigation of literary texts that narrate experience of exile, migration, and immigration, and consideration of theoretical contexts about diaspora, exile, and transnational movement.

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information:

ENG 636 Greek and Roman Myth and Modern Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Contemporary writers of fiction, poetry, and drama who use subjects and themes from classical Greek and Roman mythology.

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information:

ENG 638 Global Cities (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Study of Anglophone literature from the twentieth century to the present from cities around the world. Examination of the concept of "the city" with emphasis on cross-cultural issues of globalization, gentrification, and migration.

Section 01 – Kathleen DeGuzman | Detailed Information:

ENG 690 Senior Seminar (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 480GW with a grade of C or better, priority to English literature and English education majors in their senior year, or consent of instructor.

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, literary form, historical period, or theoretical tradition in British, American, or Global literatures. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. Intensive study of a literary topic culminating in a research paper. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information:

Section 02 – Summer Star | Detailed Information:

TPW 400GW Fundamentals of Technical and Professional Writing - GWAR (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better.

Forms, methods, standards, and issues central to the work of career writers. Students produce technical instructions, reports, promotions, and correspondence. (ABC/NC grading only)

Course Attributes: Graduation Writing Assessment

Section 01 – Bridget Gelms | Detailed Information:

TPW 480 Writing Technical Documentation (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Technical and Professional Writing student; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; or consent of instructor.

Design and develop standard types of technical documentation such as project plans, process descriptions, procedures, tutorials, and usability tests. Topics include audience analysis, writing style, and best practices. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Robert Dvorak | Detailed Information:

TPW 490 Grantwriting (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Technical and Professional Writing student; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; or consent of instructor.

Practice in grant proposal writing and research. Requests from private non-profit organizations to various funding agencies. (Plus-minus letter grade only) [CSL may be available]

Course Attributes: Social Justice

Section 01 – Regina Neu | Detailed Information:

TPW 550 Professional Editing (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Technical and Professional Writing student; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; or consent of instructor.

Expectations for professional editing in the workplace. Development of specialized projects; practice in relevant techniques; application of professional skills, standards, ethics, and methods. Review of grammar, punctuation, and usage. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

TPW 555 Visual Rhetoric and Document Design (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, or equivalent with a grade of C or better.

Principles of design and visual rhetoric; application of those principles in document design. Workshop teaches publication design software. Required laboratory. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

TPW 695 Internship in Technical and Professional Writing (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Five TPW core or skill elective courses with grades of C or better, including TWP 400GW, TPW 550, TPW 555.

Develop resume and portfolio. Practice job search and interviewing skills. Field experience: professional writing or editing, including structured supervision and evaluation by program faculty and placement sponsor. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

Graduate Courses

ENG 700 Introduction to Composition Theory (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program.

Issues of composition theory, research, and classroom practice. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Bridget Gelms | Detailed Information:

ENG 701 Theoretical Backgrounds in Community College and College Reading Instruction (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Review of research on the physiological, psychological, and linguistic processes involved in developing literacy skills on the community college and college levels; examination of the relationships between reading and writing competencies, and reading and reasoning strategies.

Section 01 – Sugie Goen-Salter | Detailed Information:

ENG 704 Pedagogical Grammar for Composition (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program.

Theory and practice of responding to linguistic, stylistic, and rhetorical issues in student writing. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Tara Lockhart | Detailed Information:

ENG 709 Seminar in Teaching Integrated Reading and Writing (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program.

Exploration of the integration of reading and writing from both a theoretical and pedagogical perspective.

Section 01 and 02 – Mark Roberge | Detailed Information:

ENG 718 Supervision of Teaching Experience (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Supervision and training in curriculum, teaching techniques, grading procedures, etc.

Section 01 – Jennifer Trainor | Detailed Information:

ENG 895 Field Study or Applied Research Project (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, adviser, department chair, and committee, approval of Advancement to Candidacy (ATC) and Culminating Experience (CE) forms by Graduate Studies.

Field study or research project incorporating application of knowledge and techniques acquired in the student's program of study. (CR/NC grading only)

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information:  English 895 is not so much a course as it is a space for you to collect, revise, and reflect on materials for your culminating experience portfolio, which will satisfy your final requirements for the MA in composition. Though there will be some common assignments and readings, the majority of this course will focus on sharing and workshopping the various items that will go into your portfolio. Your overall aim is to produce a portfolio that best represents what you have learned and experienced in this program.

ENG 713 Curriculum and Instruction II: English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Completion of subject matter certification in English or consent of instructor.

Theory, curriculum design, instruction and assessment methods for teaching English language, literature, and oral and written performance, grades 6-12.

Section 01 – James Gilligan | Detailed Information:

ENG 719 Seminar: Contemporary Semantic Theory (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor; ENG 421.

Introduces tools used to investigate semantic structure (the interpretation of linguistic expressions); develops logical representations for English sentences; investigates entailments and presuppositions at word level (lexical semantics) and discourse level (pragmatics).

Section 01 – Jenny Lederer | Detailed Information:

ENG 717 Seminar: Studies in Victorian Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Literary theory and its practical application in the college classroom. Practice in applying various critical approaches to literary texts and in designing plans for teaching the various genres.

Section 01 – Lawrence Hanley | Detailed Information:

ENG 741 Seminar: Literary Theory and Research Methods (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status in English literature master's degree program or consent of instructor.

Practice in the theory, criticism, and research methods of literary study, leading to a major research project.

Section 01 – Geoffrey Green | Detailed Information:

ENG 748 Rhetoric, Politics, and Ethics of Deconstruction (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

An exploration of the rhetoric, politics, and the ethics of deconstruction in selected works by Derrida, De Man, Lacoue-Labarthe, Nancy, and Blanchot.

Section 01 – Wai-Leung Kowk | Detailed Information:

ENG 780 Seminar: Individual Authors - Toni Morrison(Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Examination of literary works written by an individual author or group of authors. Authors to be specified in the Class Schedule. May be repeated when author varies.

Section 01 – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information: Toni Morrison

ENG 782 Seminar: Chaucer (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Selected works: examination of sources, textual problems, rhetorical techniques, language, and the cultural background.

Section 01 – Julie Paulson | Detailed Information:

ENG 790 Seminar: Selected Studies (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Examination of topics in British, American, or Global literatures, and/or literary theory. Topics to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Sara Hackenberg | Detailed Information:

ENG 803 Teaching Practicum: Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: By application only; contact English Department or see English Department website for details.

Pedagogical issues in the teaching of literature by assisting professors in conducting large lecture courses. May be repeated for a total of 6 units.

Section 01 – Julie Paulson | Detailed Information:

ENG 725 Seminar in Discourse Analysis (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 421, ENG 424, ENG 425; priority to MA Linguistics and TESOL students.

Theories and methods of discourse analysis. Students analyze texts and conversations using the various methods and submit a final project analyzing original data in the framework of their choice.

Section 01 – David Olsher | Detailed Information:

ENG 726 Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 730 (may be taken concurrently).

Through assignment as an apprentice and tutor, TESOL students gain experience with methods, materials, and procedures for teaching non-native speakers of English.

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information:

ENG 731 Seminar: TESOL Listening and Speaking Skills (Units: 3)

Prerequisites:ENG 421, ENG 424, ENG 730.

Theories, research, objectives, problems, and techniques in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages; listening and speaking skills; systematic study of materials and methods of instruction; preparation of teaching materials.

Section 01 – Priya Abeywickrama | Detailed Information:

ENG 732 Seminar: TESOL Reading and Writing Skills (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 730

The teaching of reading and writing skills to adult non-native speakers of English. Theory and research in ESL/EFL reading and composition, curriculum and lesson planning, teaching techniques and activities, materials selection and development, responding to student work, and assessment.

Section 01 – Robert Kohls | Detailed Information:

ENG 733 Seminar: Student Teaching for TESOL (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 731, ENG 732.

Teaching experience with a faculty supervisor who meets with the student teachers both individually and in groups, observes them, and reads and responds to four written papers. (CR/NC grading only)

Section 01 – David Olsher | Detailed Information:

ENG 736 Seminar in Teaching ESL in the Community (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 730 or consent of instructor.

Current objectives, problems, and techniques teaching ESL to adult immigrants in the community. Study of needs assessment, curricula, materials, and various methodologies to teach adults.

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information:

ENG 895 Field Study or Applied Research Project (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, adviser, department chair, and committee, approval of Advancement to Candidacy (ATC) and Culminating Experience (CE) forms by Graduate Studies.

Field study or research project incorporating application of knowledge and techniques acquired in the student's program of study. (CR/NC grading only)

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information:  English 895 is not so much a course as it is a space for you to collect, revise, and reflect on materials for your culminating experience portfolio, which will satisfy your final requirements for the MA in composition. Though there will be some common assignments and readings, the majority of this course will focus on sharing and workshopping the various items that will go into your portfolio. Your overall aim is to produce a portfolio that best represents what you have learned and experienced in this program.