Course Descriptions

Spring 2018 Course Descriptions

Academic Year 2017-2018 Bulletin

Undergraduate Courses

ENG 104 First Year Composition Stretch I (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Directed Self-Placement must be completed prior to enrollment.

Critical thinking skills in reading and writing. Emphasis on academic argumentation, working with and evaluating sources, conducting research and using rhetorical approaches. (ABC/NC grading, CR/NC allowed) 
(Note: Successful completion of ENG 104 and ENG 105will culminate in satisfying the Written English Composition I requirement (GE Area A2). The minimum grade for satisfying the requirement in Area A2 is a C-.)

 

ENG 114 First Year Composition (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Must complete Directed Self-Placement prior to enrollment or see Written English Requirements section of this Bulletin for other eligibility criteria.

Critical thinking skills in reading and writing. Emphasis on academic argumentation, working with and evaluating sources, conducting research and using a variety of rhetorical approaches. (ABC/NC grading, CR/NC allowed) 
(Note: For this course to satisfy General Education, students must earn a C- or CR or higher grade if taken fall 2014 or later.)

Course Attributes: A2: Written English Comm I

 

ENG 214 Second Year Written Composition: English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent with grade of CR or C- or better. 

Flexible reading and writing skills for academic inquiry and for engaging with social issues; varied composing and revising skills; critical analysis and self-reflection, with special attention to rhetorical variation; fine-tuning research. (Plus/minus ABC/NC, CR/NC allowed) [CSL may be available]

Course Attributes: A4: Written English Comm II

 

Detailed Information:

Second Year Composition emphasizes developing more flexibility in your reading and writing practices so that you can successfully tackle a wide range of writing situations or tasks. The course helps you to develop more advanced research skills, to practice responding to a wider variety of ideas and perspectives, and to create more sophisticated academic arguments in your writing. By practicing academic argumentation and inquiry and engaging with real-world issues, students will create varied, rhetorically-aware compositions. To develop responsible positions, students fine-tune their research skills, evaluating scholarly and non-scholarly sources and incorporating a variety of perspectives.

Beginning in Fall 2017, four formats of ENG 214 are available:

  • Traditional classroom sections geared towards students who learn best by actively interacting with peers/instructor in person, and those who prefer a range of interactive class activities to them understand course content and assignment requirements.
  • Hybrid sections which meet less frequently during the week but require more self-directed online work. These sections are appropriate for motivated, independent students with the sufficient self-discipline to manage their own workload and regular assignments on a weekly basis. To register for hybrid sections, search for "hybrid" under course attributes.
  • Community Service Learning sections which integrate academic concepts and service work in the community. These sections are geared towards students who want an active, real-world learning experience focused on learning from and with community partners. To register for hybrid sections, search for "service learning" under course attributes.
  • Fully Online Sections  require the most self-discipline, motivation, and independence. Students should be able to meet multiple weekly deadlines through advanced time management skills and be comfortable with technology, asking questions, and collaborating in online environments. To register, search for "fully online" sections under course attributes.

ENG 300 Graphic Memoir and Biography (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent

Examination of the literary genre of graphic memoir and graphic biography within the medium of comics. (Plus-minus ABC/NC, CR/NC allowed)

(This course is offered as ENG 300 and C W 501. Students may not repeat the course under an alternate prefix.)

Section 01 - Christopher Dowling | Detailed Information:

 

ENG 418 Grammar for Writers (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent

Focus on students' proofreading, editing, and revising their writing for academic courses. Analyze samples of writing in their disciplines to define and develop effective sentences and paragraphs. Open to all majors.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities
Section 01 – John Holland | Detailed Information:

Ever wonder why your writing doesn't seem to "flow"? Have teachers told you that your sentences seem choppy, confusing, or too simple? English 418 is a course for students who want to learn how to construct sophisticated, professional sentences. Using samples of student writing from across the disciplines, we will learn to identify common errors, develop techniques for constructing a variety of sentence structures, and focus on improving cohesion and coherence in your writing. This course will teach you how to write polished, grammatically complex sentences, and most importantly, give you confidence in your ability to express your ideas correctly and with style. I surmise that most of you have never studied formal rules and conventions of English grammar before. You'll need to start the course by learning some names and terms we use to talk about sentence structure. I recognize that these terms are unfamiliar and difficult to learn. But these early difficulties will pay off later in the course when we all have a common language to talk about our writing.

English 418 is an undergraduate general education course. In a typical semester, the vast majority of students are either Creative Writing or English Literature majors with other students representing Cinema, Journalism, Photojournalism, English Education, Business, STEM and usually 2-3 Composition graduate students, for which the course is an optional requirement toward their degree.

ENG 417 Academic Literacy and the Urban Adolescent (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Restricted to English majors; ENG 214 or equivalent. 

Service Learning, focusing on the acquisition of academic literacy by urban teens; requires 25 hours volunteering in middle or high school classrooms. Partly satisfies Early Field Experience requirement for Single Subject Credential Program. [CSL may be available]

Course Attributes: Social Justice

Section 01 – James Gilligan | Detailed Information: 

ENG 419 Advanced Composition for Teachers (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: English majors; ENG 214 or equivalent.

The composing process: purpose, audience, types of discourse, rhetorical strategies, syntactic structures, response groups. Partly satisfies Early Field Experience requirement for Single Subject Credential. Service Learning requires 20 hours tutoring in secondary Language Arts classes. [CSL may be available]

Section 01 – James Gilligan | Detailed Information: 

ENG 655 Literature and the Adolescent Reader (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent. 

Analysis and evaluation of literature about and for adolescents. Teaching approach based on reader response theory. Required for students completing the Single Subject Waiver in English.

Course Attributes: Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information: Two central purposes inform this course—to help students develop a broad familiarity with the genre of young adult literature (a very broad genre, it must be admitted) and to consider the teaching of literature to adolescents. While students do not have to plan to teach in order to take this course, questions about adolescent literacy, adolescent development, and pedagogy will resonate through the class. In particular, we will explore the following important questions: Who are adolescents? Why should adolescents read? How do the ways we teach reading influence the meaning students make from literature? What should adolescents read in school? Although these questions are especially relevant for future teachers, they fit into the larger context of English studies as well. Questions about the nature of literature, the characteristics that define literary value and quality, and the impact of different theoretical, critical and cultural approaches on meaning-making are central to the study of literature.

ENG 688 Assessment in English Language Arts (Unit: 1)

Prerequisites: Senior standing and interview with English Single Subject Credential adviser. Creation of an English Education e-Portfolio to demonstrate mastery of subject matter competency in English.

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information: 

 

ENG 420 Introduction to the Study of Language (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent. 

Linguistic investigation of sounds, words, sentences, conversations. Relationships between language, culture, dialects, mind, animal communication examined. Recommended as first language structure course.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Global Perspectives

Section 01 – Jenny Lederer | Detailed Information:

ENG 421 SYNTAX (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or ENG 420; priority to English majors, minors, and MA TESOL and Linguistics students. 

Introduction to contemporary syntactic theory and fundamentals of linguistic data analysis.

Section 01 – Anastasia Smirnova | Detailed Information: This is not a grammar class. Rather than learning proper punctuation and whether to split innitives, the study of syntax is concerned with explaining why native speakers have strong intuitions about what sounds \right." Traditional grammar classes may teach us not to end sentences with prepositions, but they do not need to warn against constructions like What do you like the man who sells? 1 Why not? Because we already know not to use them. Syntax is the study of why native speakers accept certain constructions as acceptable and reject others. What is the underlying structure that guides sentence formation in the world's languages? Linguists aim to nd the commonalities that unite human languages, and discover systematicities in the differences that divide them.

ENG 422 History of the English Language (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or ENG 420.

The background, sources, and development of English; examinations of writing of historical periods of the language.

Section 01 – TBD | Detailed Information:

ENG 424 Phonology and Morphology (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or ENG 420; priority to English majors, minors, MA Linguistics, and TESOL students. 

Theories and techniques of phonological and morphological analysis using data from English and other languages.

Section 01 – TBD| Detailed Information:

ENG 425 Language in Context (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or ENG 420; priority to English majors, minors, MA Linguistics, and TESOL students. 

Introduction to language variation relating to age, ethnicity, gender, region, class, occupation; language and culture; multilingualism. [CSL may be available]

Section 01 – TBD | Detailed Information:

ENG  620 Introduction to Computational Linguistics (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or consent of instructor.

Introduction to linguistic analysis of digital texts. Students learn to write programs in Python and to process raw texts (tokenization), discover statistical patterns in linguistic data (frequency distribution), perform part-of-speech tagging, text segmentation, and classification.

Section 01 ‐ Anastasia Smirnova | Detailed Information:

ENG 250 The Study of Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 114 or consent of instructor. 

Methods and principles for close reading literature in major genres, especially fiction, drama, and poetry. Examination and analysis of a wide variety of literary styles in works from a diverse range of both major and lesser-known writers. [Formerly ENG 150]

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Angela Jones | Detailed Information: Travel Writing: Encounters with Nature, the Wild, the Alien – In this course we will read literature produced by writers interested in how their encounters with unfamiliar landscapes, experiences, and people transformed them as individuals. Each selection raises unique questions, but themes emerge: Is it possible to see a new place for yourself or is it already mediated through mass culture? Is travel necessarily an antidote to bias? How does tourism differ from travel? How does identity affect how we see and write about the natural world? In an era of GPS and Google maps, is there anything wild left on planet Earth? How do literary constructions of wilderness interfere with or propel our understandings of self and nature? What is travel literature? How do our assumptions about nation-states and citizenship get challenged by and reinforced in travel (or in reading about travel)? All our authors provide unique lenses through which to view our own travel experiences in richer, more complex and nuanced ways.

ENG 251 The Lyric Poem in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or consent of instructor. 

Examination of a wide range of forms, styles, themes, and modes available in short lyric poetry. Detailed analysis of both form and content in the work of a variety of major and lesser-known poets.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information:

ENG 252 The Novel in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Major English and American novelists and variations in the genre between Defoe and the present.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information:

ENG  255 Contemporary Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Selected poetry, fiction, and drama of the late 19th century to the present. [Formerly ENG 155]

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information: In this course, we will read plays, short stories, novels, and essays by writers from 1945 to the present. Our focus will be identity, particularly the ways in which identity is contingent and fluid. We will also discuss borders - physical, emotional, ethnic, racial, sexual, linguistic, national, and literary. Texts will include David Hwang's play M. Butterfly, Bharati Mukherjee’s novel Jasmine, and Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir Fun Home. Students will hone their writing and close reading skills, participate in meaningful group work, and produce a final project that is analytical, creative, and performative in nature.

ENG 258 American Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Selected masterpieces of American literature.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Lawrence Hanley | Detailed Information: This course surveys some of the key figures, movements, and texts of 19th and 20th-century American literature. To tame this profusion of words and stories, our loose focus will be on the city and urban experience in American poetry, fiction, and drama. Some of the writers we’ll read include: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Stephen Crane, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Dashiell Hammett, Arthur Miller, Allen Ginsberg, the Nuyorican Poets Café, and Karen Tei Yamashita. Grading will favor consistent, authentic, and reflective engagement with the texts we read. There will be no midterm or final essays - - but there will be plenty of regular, shorter writing assignments and some quizzes.

Section 02 – Lynn Wardley | Detailed Information:

ENG 259 Introduction to Shakespeare (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

For potential English majors unacquainted with Shakespeare's work and non-majors not yet conscious of themselves as heirs of Shakespeare's language and culture, and beneficiaries of his dramatic gifts.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information: Course texts: Julius Caesar, The Merchant of Venice, Macbeth, Hamlet, Othello. The course texts will occasionally be supplemented with audio recordings and videocassette tapes of Shakespeare's plays and lyrics. There will be some handouts of poetry and literary criticism related to Shakespearean drama. Some of the poetry will be only poets and dramatists of the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods.

ENG 260 Introduction to Science Fiction (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Surveys the development of science fiction narratives in English through exploring four classic conventions of the genre: encounters with aliens, the possibilities of machine intelligence, utopias/dystopias, and post-apocalyptic scenarios.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Margaret Schoerke | Detailed Information:This course surveys the development of Science Fiction narratives in English through exploring four classic conventions of the genre: encounters with aliens; the possibilities for machine intelligence (robots, computers, cyborgs); utopias/dystopias; and post-apocalyptic scenarios. We will read short stories by H.G. Wells, E. M. Forster, Hugo Gernsback, John Campbell, E. E. "Doc" Smith, W.E.B. Du Bois, Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke, Theodore Sturgeon, Ray Bradbury, Alfred Bester, Frederick Pohl, Kurt Vonnegut, Harlan Ellison, Samuel Delaney, Dick, James Tiptree, Jr., and Octavia Butler. We will also read four novels: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, George Orwell's 1984, Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and Ursula K. Le Guin's The Left Hand of Darkness.

ENG 261 The Vampire Tradition (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

The vampire in literature and film as a rich, complex icon that exaggerates culture anxieties about otherness, morality, and identity, and reveals changing social attitude about race, class, gender, and sexuality.

Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Sarah Hackenberg | Detailed Information: This course examines the vampire in literature and film as an icon that exaggerates cultural anxieties about otherness, morality, and identity, and reveals changing attitudes about race, class, gender, and sexuality. Texts include: Coleridge’s “Cristabel”; Keats’s “Lamia”; J. M. Rhymer’s serialized Varney the Vampire, or, The Feast of Blood; Le Fanu's Carmilla; Stoker’s Dracula, and stories by John Polidori, Edgar Allan Poe, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Catherine L. Moore, Anne Rice, Poppy Z. Brite, and more. Cinema/TV texts include: Les Vampires (1915); Blacula (1972); The Hunger (1983); and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

ENG 429 Stylistics (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Analysis of syntax, diction, and other devices that contribute to what we call literary "style" in a variety of 19th and 20th century works of fiction and non-fiction.

Section 01 – Margaret Schoerke | Detailed Information: What is style and how does it shape what a writer says? We will explore this question through studying types and patterns of diction, figurative language (tropes), and sentences (schemes), and we will ground our study on an on-going review of English grammar and syntax. The course will help students learn how to develop close readings of literary texts, ground those readings on stylistic analysis, and understand how “form” and “content” intertwine. Along with honing stylistic analysis skills to understand the structure and rhetorical power of a variety of texts, students will cultivate style in their own writing through developing portfolios consisting of their own versions of tropes and schemes and imitations of great stylists. English 429 fulfills the linguistics requirement for the English Literature major.

ENG 460 Literature in English I: Beginnings through the 17th Century (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Introduction to the history and aesthetics of influential Old English, Middle English, sixteenth- and seventeenth-century texts written in England and America.

Section 01 – Julie Paulson | Detailed Information:This course begins with earliest extant Old English poem, Caedmon’s Hymn, written in the seventh century. Covering a period of roughly one thousand years, the course highlights the most influential medieval and Renaissance literature, including Beowulf, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s Faerie Queene, and culminates with Milton’s seventeenth-century epic Paradise Lost. The Middle Ages is often imagined as a strange and distant period that came to an end with the onset of modernity. By contrast, the Renaissance is commonly understood to have ushered in the modern era, a period continuous with our own. Yet what makes us feel that Shakespeare is a part of our own era whereas the early-sixteenth-century play Everyman, composed seventy years or so before Shakespeare’s birth, is unmistakably medieval? This course will challenge us to account for the enormous changes we perceive in the cultures and literatures of late medieval and early modern England. Accordingly, we will take up questions surrounding how we write English literary history and the paradigms of thought (rupture, transformation, revolution, reform) that have characterized how we think about the transition between these periods.Teaching methods will include lecture, discussion, and small group work.

ENG 461 Literature in English II: 18th and 19th Centuries (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Introduction to the history and aesthetics of influential eighteenth- and nineteenth-century texts written in England and America.

Section 01 – Summer Star | Detailed Information:

Section 02 – Lynn Wardley | Detailed Information:

ENG 462 Literature in English III: The Twentieth Century (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Survey of key texts, debates, and literary historical landmarks in the study of twentieth-century literature in English.

Section 01 – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information:

ENG 480GW Junior Seminar - GWAR (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Restricted to English major and minor; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. (English major must complete ENG 480GW before the end of the junior year.)

Practical criticism; techniques in the art of reading literature and writing about it in a series of short papers. Majors must complete this course before the end of the junior year. (ABC/NC grading only)

Course Attributes: Graduation Writing Assessment

Section 01 – Angela Jones | Detailed Information:

Section 02 – Mary Soliday | Detailed Information: English 480: Junior Seminar introduces English majors to the habits of mind typical of English Studies; and it fulfills the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). To accomplish both aims, this section of 480 will focus on ways of reading and writing. Analysis is only one mode of reading and writing: we will consider other pleasurable modes as well, including an emphasis on integrating what you are learning in other English classes into this one. We’ll spend part of the semester reading a long novel, and the rest on reading poetry; you will choose most of the poems we read, and some will be performed. You’ll write short pieces every week, and these will form the basis of class discussion; several classes will be devoted to writers’ workshops, where you will, among other things, select a weekly piece to develop into a culminating, and creative, essay that richly interprets a literary text in your own, genuine voice. Required texts at the SF State Bookstore include the Broadview edition of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles and a poetry anthology.

Section 03 – Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information: This course serves as an introduction to the English major and will focus on issues and concerns that pertain to the study of literature. We will not only learn to read literature critically, analytically, and imaginatively, but will also explore what it is that we are reading (the nature of literature), what it is we are doing when we read (the nature of interpretation), and what the relationship of literature to politics, history, culture, and the other arts might be. Readings will include poetry, short stories, and literary criticism.

Section 04 – Beverly Voloshin | Detailed Information: Junior Seminar is the portal course for the English major as well as serving as the writing-intensive course for the major. What is literature, why write about it, how can we write about a literary work in ways that matter? We will write essays and also have frequent short in-class writing assignments. In your writing you will be engaged with some of the issues raised in class. Format: some lecture, plenty of discussion. Attendance is required, and your participation is encouraged. Our texts include two novels, very different from each other but both deeply engaged with American history; poetry; and a film.

ENG 503 Studies in Medieval Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent.

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, work, or issue in Medieval literature. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Julie Paulson | Detailed Information:The sixteenth-century Scottish poet Gavin Douglas famously wrote that Chaucer “was ever, God wait, wemenis frend” (“was ever, God knows, a friend to women”). Chaucer and “the woman question”—how Chaucer thought about the role and nature of women—has been of abiding interest to his readers. In this course, we will read some of Chaucer’s most famous works with a focus on how he represented women, gender issues and stereotypes, and power relations between men and women. In doing so, the course will also introduce students to the social, cultural, political, and religious contexts of Chaucer’s writing; familiarize students with literary critical approaches to Chaucer’s poetry, especially feminist ones; and develop students’ research, critical thinking, and writing skills.

ENG 512 18th Century British Women Writers (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent.

Introduction to fiction, poetry, drama, and writing by a variety of authors from a key period in British women's writing. Exploration of the literary, political, and economic context of this creative flowering, as well as the forces that hampered it.

Section 01 – William Christmas | Detailed Information:This course takes as its subject what used to be called the “other” eighteenth century: the many women writers who found their way into print in the period. Over the last several decades, eighteenth-century women writers have come to be well represented in academic publisher’s lists and in anthologies of the period’s literature. Some of what we discuss will have to do with this process of canon formation. Most of our work, however, will center on the texts themselves. We will read a selection of poetry, drama, novels, and philosophical tracts by these “Amazons of the pen” (as Johnson affectionately, if also apprehensively, called them). Expect to spend more time with Aphra Behn, Anne Finch, and Eliza Haywood, and meet new figures like Mary Astell, Charlotte Lennox, Sarah Scott, and Ann Yearsley.

ENG 514 Age of the Romantics (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Poetry and prose of Blake, Coleridge, Byron, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats.

Section 01 –Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information:This class will explore what is distinctive about the literature of the Romantic writers and how their writings respond to the political and cultural climates of England and Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. We will examine how the Romantics address concerns that are still important to us, and in doing so, gain a better understanding not only of ourselves but also of the various ways in which literature and the past continue to speak to our present.

ENG 526 Age of the American Renaissance: 1830-1860 (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Achievement of a national literature in the works of such writers as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Frederick Douglass, with reading of earlier authors.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities, Social Justice

Section 01 – Beverly Voloshin | Detailed Information:A study of the seminal period of U.S. literature, from about 1830 through the Civil War. There is a lot of truly great writing from this era. We will discuss works in a range of genres--poetry, short story, novel, essay, autobiography, political oratory. We will analyze these works in terms of form and content and place them in certain literary, philosophical, social, and political contexts. We will think about these texts as works of art engaged with their own times; we will place them in dialogue with each other; and we will think about how they might speak to us, now. Your regular attendance and your participation are keys to the success of this course.

ENG 528 American Literature: 1914-1960 (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Stories, drama, and criticism by such authors as Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Wallace Stevens, Robert Lowell, and Sylvia Plath.

Section 01 – Lawrence Hanley | Detailed Information:This course surveys some of the key figures, movements, and texts of late 19th century American literature. The emphasis is on grasping the contours of American literature and culture as they emerge from the cataclysm of the Civil War and push forward unsteadily but energetically toward American modernity. Some of our course topics include: post-Whitmanian poetry; the flowering of literary realism; Victorian multiculturalism; lowbrow and highbrow; radical subcultures. Our reading list includes: Whitman, Twain, W.D. Howells, Henry James, William James, W.E.B. Du Bois, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jack London, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Mary Antin, Sarah Orne Jewett, and others.

ENG 535 Literature and Ecology (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

An appraisal of literary works in light of their representation of nature and their ecological wisdom. Examples of post-romantic American literature of nature. The theory and practice of ecocriticism.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Environmental Sustainability

Section 01 – Lynn Wardley | Detailed Information:

ENG 555 The Short Story (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Short story as a distinctive literary phenomenon. Historical consideration; critical analysis of representative modern stories.

Section 01 – Michael Krasny | Detailed Information:This is a global survey course of short story masterpieces which serves as an introduction to a wide range of great and revered storytellers. Course requirements include critical essays and exams.

ENG 565 The Short Story: Global Literature in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

The short story as a distinctive literary phenomenon of global literature in English, examined in relation to cultural perspectives and literary-historical traditions.

Course Attributes: Global Perspectives

Section 01 – Geoffrey Green | Detailed Information:The course will be a mix of lecture and discussion. We will necessarily talk about the relationship between historical events, different cultural perspectives, and the short story form in global literature in English. Using short stories from a variety of cultures, traditions, perspectives, and literary styles, we will explore the uniqueness of cultural difference as well as the transcendence of general human qualities across cultures, time, and tradition. Paper, midterm, and final exam.

ENG 580 Individual Authors (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Rotating course on a specific author, or group of authors, in British, American, or Global literatures of any period. Topic to be specified in the Class Schedule. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Section 01 – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information:An intensive study of Woolf's major novels and essays. We will consider Woolf's position in the modernist canon, and her significance for feminist literary study.

ENG 581 Jane Austen (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Lecture/discussion course on the complete works of Jane Austen.

Course Attribute: E1: Lifelong Learning Develop

Section 01 ‐ William Christmas | Detailed Information:This course is devoted to an in-depth study of both Austen's achievement as a novelist and the role(s) her novels and authorial persona continue to play within contemporary popular culture. We shall read an example of Austen's juvenilia and her six published novels closely focusing on a wide variety of aesthetic and thematic topics. In addition, we will discuss various modern forms of Austenian adaptation, from feature film scenes to children’s books. Students will also contribute to an ongoing digital humanities project by writing scholarly annotations for a specific Austen novel, and publishing their work on our “Annotating Austen” website. Written work will include several short papers and an end-of-semester critical/creative project.

ENG 583 Shakespeare: Representative Plays (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Shakespeare and his age; his development as a dramatist and his literary, intellectual, and social milieu. Reading of representative comedies, histories, and tragedies as well as some non-dramatic poetry.

Course Attributes: E1: Lifelong Learning Develop

Section 01 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information:This course is designed to introduce students to a range of representative plays—comedies, tragedies, romances and ‘problem plays’—from the Shakespearean corpus. Through close readings (and occasional film screenings) of representative plays, we will explore a range of topics related to Shakespearean drama. In the course of the semester, we will acquaint ourselves with the society and culture in which these plays were created, the theatrical context in which they were performed, and the historical processes by which they have come down to us. Some of the following questions will inform our discussions: How is gender negotiated on the Shakespearean stage? How is religious difference performed? How is the body subject to discipline and punishment? How are representations of the body linked with emerging discourses of nationhood, race, class, and sexuality in early modern England? Plays will include The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Othello, and The Tempest.

ENG 584 Shakespeare: Selected Plays (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Study of a few plays in relation to the textual problems, dramatic technique, and problems of interpretation. Analysis of language, imagery, and structure.

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information:

ENG 589 Milton (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

In-depth study of Milton's prose and poetry; examination of technique, language, imagery, and interpretation.

Section 01 ‐ Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information:

ENG 600 Theory of Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Analysis of literature as symbolic action; the recurring motives and concepts which figure in formal appeals; the relationship between literature and rhetoric; the tactics and grounds of persuasion in literature.

Section 01 ‐ Geoffrey Green | Detailed Information:“Mirror, Mirror: Reflexivity and the Crisis of Representation.” Studies in the esthetic reflection of “the real.” We will explore the theme of the double (doppelgänger) and the implications and responsibilities inherent in artistic representation. The Double and the Other: in fiction/reality; psychological conception of the self; in love; in writing; in art; in language; in culture; nature/technology; self/other; mediation and doubling; voyeurism/surveillance; gender roles; trauma. We will examine the intrinsic mirroring or doubling of the self within every artistic project. Are you looking at me? Are you looking at me? Are you looking at me? Readings by Borges, Poe, Conrad, Clemens, Nabokov, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Stevenson, Dostoevsky, Henry James, Wilde, Auster. Critical essays by Otto Rank, Freud, Lacan, Coates. Films by Hitchcock, Cukor, Sekely, Collet-Serra, Siodmak, Brahm. Paper, midterm, and final exam.

ENG 602 Literature and Society (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Selected novels and drama which primarily reflect the social scene. Cultural changes as they affect the writer, his delineation of character and his perspective on society.

Course Attribute: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities; American Ethnic & Racial Minorities

Section 01 ‐ Lawrence Hanley | Detailed Information:Twitter. Instagram. Facebook. Apps. Texting. Smartphones and tablets. The ways in which we communicate and understand our humanity have changed profoundly over the past two decades. This course will explore digital culture, especially how contemporary writers and artists represent digital culture and engage in debates about the meaning and consequences of life in the digital age. Our reading list includes: William Gibson, Neuromancer; Barbara Browning, I’m Trying to Reach You; Dave Eggers, The Circle; Hari Kunzru, Transmission; Alina Simone, Note to Self: A Novel; Ernest Cline,Ready, Player One; a handful of movies; miscellaneous essays and YouTube channels. Topics include: identity, labor, data, cognitive capitalism, surrealism, and games people play. Assignments will include: regular blogging; two short papers; one final, multimedia essay.

ENG 611 Modern Criticism (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Examination of critical approaches including the formalist and the psychoanalytic. Application of one or more critical methods to works of imaginative literature.

Section 01 – Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information:Through a close reading of selected texts in literature and criticism, we will examine how the phenomenon of "literature" and the notion of "literariness" have been defined and characterized in modern times. Among the topics we will be exploring together: the relationships between literature and history, literature and ethics, literature and politics; the ontology of the literary work; the debates over canonization; the polemic over feminist criticism and cultural criticism; the responsibility of the intellectual as literary scholar, critic, and teacher.

ENG 614 Women in Literature: Authors and Characters (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, or issue focused on literature and/or criticism by women writers of any period. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information:While questioning our assumptions about two ostensibly straightforward terms – “WOMEN” and “LITERATURE” -- we will also examine how gendered identities intersect with sexual, racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic identities in four coming-of-age narratives: Toni Morrison’s Sula; Bharati Mukherjee’s Jasmine; Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; and Helena Maria Viramontes’ Under the Feet of Jesus. In addition, we will read the work of a wide range of feminist theorists, including Virginia Woolf, Monique Wittig, Barbara Christian, and Chandra Talpade Mohanty. (Note that this course fulfills the Theory/Criticism requirement for English Literature Majors). There will also be room for students to consider how questions raised by women writers resonate in their own lives and in popular culture. (Beyoncé’s Lemonade may be mandatory viewing). Requirements include several analytical papers, active participation in class, and a final project in which each student writes and performs a monologue from the perspective of one of the feminist critics studied during the semester.

ENG 630 Selected Studies (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, or issue in literature from a variety of national traditions and/or historical periods. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Sarah Hackenberg | Detailed Information:This course will focus on England’s emergence as a colonizing nation, especially from 1550-1700. England’s projects in America will be our primary focus, studied with reference to African and Asian cultural exchange and the influence of other imperial powers like the Spanish. We will study representations of “others” in English literature, but also, significantly, simultaneous constructions of Englishness in this proto-national period. We will spend significant time on 1640-1700, studying the autobiographical accounts of English women and men who lived in the “New World,” as well as asking whether we can recover the voices of indigenous Americans in surviving English texts.​ English 460 and 480 recommended. This course fulfills the pre-1800 credit.

ENG 631 Post-Colonial Literature in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Contemporary literature in English by writers from former Third World colonies.

Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Global Perspectives

Section 01 –Kathleen DeGuzman | Detailed Information:Postcolonial Literature in English For many, the Caribbean is simply a group of islands between the U.S. and South America that brings to mind pleasant images of beaches, sunshine, and pleasure. This class looks beyond those images and to the histories of colonization and slavery--and to the resilient practices of storytelling and imaginative agency. By the end of the semester, students grasp how the economic, racial, and cultural inequities fostered by these histories still exist alongside the creative will to imagine the so-called "postcolonial" world otherwise. Readings include two novels as well as some poetry and autobiographical writing.

Section 01 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information:This course explores the myriad forms of self-fashioning delineated in the postcolonial novel. What are the forces—historical, cultural, and political—that shape postcolonial identities in all their complexities? How are these identities inflected in terms of gender, class, and ethnicity? Through an examination of works by a range of postcolonial writers, we will engage with the literary representation, mediation, and construction of these identities. We will especially consider issues related to the legacy of colonialism, the shadow of nationalism, the search for roots and routes, and the complex nature of postcolonial modernities, as they are dealt with in these works. Authors covered in the course will include Salman Rushdie, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Jamaica Kincaid, Jhumpa Lahiri, Julia Alvarez, and Mohsin Hamid.

ENG 632 The Literature of Exile and Migration (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

Investigation of literary texts that narrate experience of exile, migration, and immigration, and consideration of theoretical contexts about diaspora, exile, and transnational movement.

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information: 

ENG 636 Greek and Roman Myth and Modern Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Contemporary writers of fiction, poetry, and drama who use subjects and themes from classical Greek and Roman mythology.

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information: 

ENG 690 Senior Seminar (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 480GW with a grade of C or better, priority to English literature and English education majors in their senior year, or consent of instructor.

Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, literary form, historical period, or theoretical tradition in British, American, or Global literatures. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. Intensive study of a literary topic culminating in a research paper. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information:

Section 02 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information: This course examines food as subject, as form, as trope, as metaphor, and as key ingredient in literature. It looks at food in the literary text, food text as literature, and literature as food for thought. Throughout the semester, we will consider food in different genres from different time periods and different global literary traditions. Our discussions will take up some of the following questions raised in literary texts: How are we what we eat? Where do we eat, who cooks, who eats, and who is eaten? What are the ethics of ‘eating right’? How is food linked with questions of racial, ethnic, and national identity? We will continually examine the development of food studies in relation to an alimentary approach, whether in postcolonial studies, critical race studies, ecocritical studies, or gender and sexuality studies. Texts will include “A Modest Proposal,” Interpreter of Maladies, Nervous Conditions, Fried Green Tomatoes, A Cafecito Story, along with excerpts from The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Fast Food Nation, and “The Slow Food Manifesto.” Assignments will include short papers, literature surveys, and a final research paper.

Section 03 – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information: In this course, we will read all 11 novels of Toni Morrison, the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. Tackling topics such as familial bonds, emotional, sexual, and physical violence, and the effects of white supremacy in Black communities, Morrison tells stories that provoke, shatter, and heal. She reminds us of the power of language and our responsibility to nurture it. As Morrison stated in her 1993 Nobel Lecture: “We die. That may be the meaning of life. But we do language. That may be the measure of our lives.” Students should be prepared to write weekly response papers, to participate thoughtfully in classroom discussions, and to produce a final research paper on some aspect of Morrison’s oeuvre.

TPW 400GW Fundamentals of Technical and Professional Writing - GWAR (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better.

Forms, methods, standards, and issues central to the work of career writers. Students produce technical instructions, reports, promotions, and correspondence. (ABC/NC grading only)

Course Attributes: Graduation Writing Assessment

Section 01 – Louise Rehling | Detailed Information:

TPW 470 Professional Promotions (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Technical and Professional Writing student; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; or consent of instructor.

Developing documents for corporate communications, marketing, public relations, and development purposes. High-tech and non-profit applications. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Megan Little | Detailed Information:

TPW 490 Grantwriting (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Technical and Professional Writing student; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; or consent of instructor. 

Practice in grant proposal writing and research. Requests from private non-profit organizations to various funding agencies. (Plus-minus letter grade only) [CSL may be available]

Course Attributes: Social Justice

Section 01 – Regina Neu | Detailed Information:

TPW 550 Professional Editing (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Technical and Professional Writing student; ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; or consent of instructor.

Expectations for professional editing in the workplace. Development of specialized projects; practice in relevant techniques; application of professional skills, standards, ethics, and methods. Review of grammar, punctuation, and usage. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Louise Rehling | Detailed Information:

TPW 555 Visual Rhetoric and Document Design (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent with a grade of C or better.

Principles of design and visual rhetoric; application of those principles in document design. Workshop teaches publication design software. Required laboratory. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

TPW 600 Individual and Team Writing (Units: 3)

Prerequisite:TPW 400GW, TPW 550, TPW 555 with grades of C or better..

Developing professional skills for project management, research, group work, genre analysis, writing, editing production, and presentation. Individual projects explore current tools, trends, and technologies. Teams develop professional materials for local non-profits. (Plus-minus letter grade only) [CSL may be available]

Course Attribute: Social Justice

Section 01 – Louise Rehling | Detailed Information:

TPW 695 Internship in Technical and Professional Writing (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Five TPW core or skill elective courses with grades of C or better, including TPW 400GWTPW 550TPW 555.

Develop resume and portfolio. Practice job search and interviewing skills. Field experience: professional writing or editing, including structured supervision and evaluation by program faculty and placement sponsor. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

TPW 699 Independent Study (Units: 1-4)

Prerequisites: Five TPW core or skills elective courses with grades of C or better, including TPW 400GWTPW 550TPW 555; consent of instructor.

Special study in some aspect of technical and professional writing, performed under program faculty supervision. May be repeated for a total of 4 units.

Section 01 – Staff | Detailed Information: 

Graduate Courses

ENG 700 Introduction to Composition Theory (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program.

Issues of composition theory, research, and classroom practice. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Tara Lockhart | Detailed Information:

ENG 704 Pedagogical Grammar for Composition (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program.

Theory and practice of responding to linguistic, stylistic, and rhetorical issues in student writing. (Plus-minus letter grade only)

Section 01 – Tara Lockhart | Detailed Information:

ENG 710 Design in Composition and Post-Secondary Reading (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program; ENG 704 or ENG 709 with a grade of B or better.

Theory and practice of designing post-secondary reading and composition courses.

Section 01 and 02 – Mark Roberge | Detailed Information: This class introduces students to the theory and practices needed to design required college-level writing courses, including: overall course design, writing and sequencing assignments, responding to student writing, pedagogies that address diverse student needs, and acting as reflective practitioners of writing instruction. Some observation of writing instruction may be required, depending on your experience.

ENG 715 Pedagogy and Practice Post-Secondary Reading (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Theory-into-practice course in which students develop lesson plans for teaching basic literacy skills. Requires 2 hours of tutoring per week in the English Tutoring Center of IRW students.

 

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information: 

ENG 895 Field Study or Applied Research Project (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, adviser, department chair, and committee, approval of Advancement to Candidacy (ATC) and Culminating Experience (CE) forms by Graduate Studies.

Field study or research project incorporating application of knowledge and techniques acquired in the student's program of study. (CR/NC grading only)

 

Section 01 – Jennifer Trainor | Detailed Information: English 895 is not so much a course as it is a space for you to collect, revise, and reflect on materials for your culminating experience portfolio, which will satisfy your final requirements for the MA in composition. Though there will be some common assignments and readings, the majority of this course will focus on sharing and workshopping the various items that will go into your portfolio. Your overall aim is to produce a portfolio that best represents what you have learned and experienced in this program.

ENG 714 Curriculum and Instruction II: English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 713, Subject Matter Competency certification in English, concurrent enrollment in student teaching.

Applied theory, curriculum design, instruction, and assessment methods for teaching English language, literature, oral and written performance; grades 6-12. (AB/NC grading only)

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information: 

ENG 715 Pedagogy and Practice of Post-Secondary Reading (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Theory-into-practice course in which students develop lesson plans for teaching basic literacy skills. Requires 2 hours of tutoring per week in the English Tutoring Center of IRW students.

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information: 

 

ENG 723 Seminar in Structure of English (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor; ENG 421.

Advanced study in the semantic and discourse-pragmatic structure of English from the perspective of cognitive linguistics. Research projects required.

Section 01 – Jenny Lederer | Detailed Information: 

ENG 727 Linguistic Field Methods (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 421ENG 424ENG 425; priority to MA Linguistics and TESOL students.

Introduction to basic documentary linguistics and linguistic fieldwork through the elicitation and analysis of data from an unfamiliar language; discussion of research ethics and project logistics.

Section 01 – Jenny Lederer | Detailed Information: 

ENG 741 Seminar: Literary Theory and Research Methods (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status in English literature master's degree program or consent of instructor. 

Practice in the theory, criticism, and research methods of literary study, leading to a major research project.

Section 01 – Beverly Voloshin | Detailed Information: This is the portal course for the master's program in English and American literature. We will study representative works in the large field of theory of literature, from the ancients to the postmoderns; the course also functions as an introduction to graduate study of literature, including literary research, bibliography, and textual criticism. I will try to group the theoretical works in interesting clusters, such that they begin to speak to each other, with our help as intermediaries and interlocutors. The literary focus of the course will be Melville's Moby-Dick. I am ordering The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (2nd ed.) and Moby-Dick (Norton Critical Edition, 2nd ed.), as well as a few other books that should be useful to you throughout your career as a scholar, teacher, or writer--or simply in your life as a serious lover of literature. Assignments include three essays of about 8-10 pages and a presentation. This course will be stimulating for instructor and seminar members alike. Prerequisite: classified standing in the MA literature program, or consent of the instructor.

Because there is a lot of reading in this course, please begin reading Moby Dick before the semester begins.

ENG 742 Seminar: Studies in Criticism (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (maybe taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Examination of specific topic, critic or group of critics, and/or tradition in literary criticism. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Geoffrey Green | Detailed Information:Literary representation of reality involves literature, history, and exile, anticipating diaspora and globalization studies. Erich Auerbach's landmark book, Mimesis, a work on literary history and theory of crucial importance, provides a context for considering these important literary critical issues. In recent years, Auerbach's Mimesis has attracted great attention. Frederic Jameson calls it "one of the half dozen most important literary-critical works of the 20th century." Stephen Greenblatt terms it "essential" and Michael Dirda, a "masterpiece." This seminar devoted to the study of Auerbach and his masterpiece is the first offered at SFSU. Theorists such as Edward Said, Greenblatt, Dirda, David Damrosch, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht attest to its legacy. Texts include: Auerbach’s Mimesis; Green’s Literary Criticism and the Structures of History: Erich Auerbach and Leo Spitzer; essays by: Auerbach; Said; Krystal; Green; Gumbrecht. Seminar format: class presentation with written handout, and term paper.

ENG 755 Seminar: Studies in Victorian Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Examination of topics in English literature of the Victorian period. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated as topics vary.

Section 01 – Summer Star | Detailed Information:

ENG 762 Seminar: Twentieth Century American Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Examination of topics in 20th-c. American literature. Topics to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Margaret Schoerke | Detailed Information:Through a close reading of several important experimental books that combine poetry and prose, the seminar will explore the interrelation between these two genres in 20th century American writing. We will try to answer questions such as: Is there such a thing as “prose poetry”? What is genre--and is it obsolete? How and why have modern and post-modern poets incorporated prose techniques into their work? Texts will include William Carlos Williams’s Spring and All; Marianne Moore's Observations; Jean Toomer’s Cane; W. H. Auden's The Sea and the Mirror; Robert Lowell’s Life Studies; Vladimir Nabokov's Pale Fire; and Tyhimba Jess's Olio.

ENG 763 Contemporary American Short Fiction (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Advanced study of the major fiction writers, post-World War II era to the present. The contemporary short story in the United States.

Section 01 – Michael Krasny | Detailed Information:The course covers a range of short fiction from the contemporary period in American letters. The texts include THE CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SHORT STORY edited by B. Minh Nguyen and Porter Shreve (Pearson/Longmann) and AMERICAN SHORT STORIES SINCE 1945 edited by John G. Parks (Oxford University Press). Course requirements are three essays of three to five pages on a topic of your choice . These should be well-focused examinations of a question or position or problem . You will need to hone in on an analysis of any one of the stories on the course syllabus. You will also be responsible for a presentation on any one of the stories included on the syllabus and a ten page critical review/assessment of a volume of short stories selected with the approval of the professor due by semester’s end.

ENG 776 Studies in Caribbean Literature in English (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Examination of primarily Anglophone Caribbean literature from the nineteenth century to the present day. Genres covered range from the slave narrative and the novel to epic and performance poetry.

Section 01 – Kathleen DeGuzman | Detailed Information:Studies in Caribbean Literature This new course introduces graduate students to the breadth of Caribbean literature, a tradition of writing that has been concerned with issues of voice, history, and liberation since its inception during the era of slavery and colonialism. Students will study texts ranging from nineteenth-¬century slave narratives to novels and poetry about migration and decolonization in the twentieth century to contemporary best¬selling novels by Caribbean American writers. Alongside this range of literature, students will also learn about concepts such as creolization, diaspora, and the archipelago.

ENG 789 Milton (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

In-depth study of Milton's prose and poetry; examination of technique, language, imagery and interpretation.

Section 01 – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information:

ENG 803 Teaching Practicum: Literature (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: By application only; contact English Department or see English Department website for details.

Pedagogical issues in the teaching of literature by assisting professors in conducting large lecture courses. May be repeated for a total of 6 units.

Section 01 – William Christmas | Detailed Information: 

ENG 721 Advanced Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 421 or equivalent.

Advanced study in grammar teaching for ESL and EFL contexts. Includes a review of grammatical structures and functions, and common language learner errors. Focus on pedagogical theory applied to error analysis, deductive and inductive teaching approaches, pedagogical tasks, and corrective feedback.

Section 01 – David Olsher | Detailed Information:

ENG 724 Special Topics in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 730 or consent of instructor. 

Introduction to theory, research and pedagogical innovations in key areas of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, including applications to materials design, lesson planning, and assessment. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary.

Section 01 – Olsher | Detailed Information: 

ENG 730 Seminar: Introduction to Graduate Study of TESOL (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 421ENG 424, .

Contemporary theories, approaches, theories, and practical procedures in teaching English as a second or foreign language. Principles and current practices in curriculum development, lesson design, skill development, classroom management, and assessment.

Section 01 – Robert Kohls | Detailed Information:

ENG 733 Seminar: Student Teaching for TESOL (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: ENG 731ENG 732.

Teaching experience with a faculty supervisor who meets with the student teachers both individually and in groups, observes them, and reads and responds to four written papers. (CR/NC grading only)

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information: English 733 (Student Teaching—TESOL) is an opportunity for you to get intensive, hands-on experience working in an ESL class either on campus or off campus. It is a semester-long course whose primary focus is teaching experience. Listed below are the specific course requirements, which are designed to provide you with some structure, as well as opportunities for reflection and feedback, as you engage in this important part of your M.A. TESOL education.

ENG 734 TESOL Curriculum and Assessment (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: ENG 730, ENG 731, ENG 732, or consent of instructor.

MA TESOL students develop an original curriculum and assessment procedure for a specific learning context. Assigned readings cover theoretical and practical issues in syllabus design, materials development, and language assessment.

Section 01 – Priyavanda Abeywickrama | Detailed Information:

ENG 891 Integrative Seminar in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Final semester in M.A. program.

Major issues in teaching English to speakers of other languages. For Master of Arts candidates in English with Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. (CR/NC grading only)

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information: