Spring 2017 Course Descriptions

Undergraduate:

Undergraduate Writing Program | English Education | Linguistics | Literature | Technical & Professional Writing

Graduate:

Composition | English Education | Literature | MA TESOL

Academic Year 2016-2017 Bulletin

Undergraduate

Undergraduate Writing Programs

214 - Second Year Composition

Second Year Composition emphasizes developing more flexibility in your reading and writing practices so that you can successfully tackle a wide range of writing situations or tasks. The course helps you to develop more advanced research skills, to practice responding to a wider variety of ideas and perspectives, and to create more sophisticated academic arguments in your writing. By practicing academic argumentation and inquiry and engaging with real-world issues, students will create varied, rhetorically-aware compositions. To develop responsible positions, students fine-tune their research skills, evaluating scholarly and non-scholarly sources and incorporating a variety of perspectives.

Beginning in Spring 2017, three formats of ENG 214 are available:

  • Traditional classroom sections geared towards students who learn best by actively interacting with peers/instructor in person, and those who prefer a range of interactive class activities to them understand course content and assignment requirements.
  • Hybrid sections which meet less frequently during the week but require more self-directed online work. These sections are appropriate for motivated, independent students with the sufficient self-discipline to manage their own workload and regular assignments on a weekly basis. To register for hybrid sections, search for "hybrid" under course attributes.
  • Community Service Learning sections which integrate academic concepts and service work in the community. These sections are geared towards students who want an active, real-world learning experience focused on learning from and with community partners. To register for hybrid sections, search for "service learning" under course attributes.

 

English Education

417 – Academic Literacy and the Urban Adolescent

2016-2017 Bulletin: Service Learning, focusing on the acquisition of academic literacy by urban teens; requires 25 hours volunteering in middle or high school classrooms. Partly satisfies Early Field Experience requirement for Single Subject Credential Program. [CSL is available; consult index for page reference.] PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent; English majors. Course Attributes: Social Justice.

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information: This community-service-learning course satisfies the 45-hour pre-service requirement for admission to the single-subject credential program.  Working with the community organization 826 Valencia, students will volunteer in local middle and high schools to help adolescents improve their writing.  Your own reading, writing, and discussion in the class will help you understand academic literacy, particularly in urban contexts, and how adolescents develop academic literacy.

419 – Advanced Composition for Teachers

2016-2017 Bulletin: The composing process: purpose, audience, types of discourse, rhetorical strategies, syntactic structures, response groups. Partly satisfies Early Field Experience requirement for Single Subject Credential. Service Learning requires 20 hours tutoring in secondary Language Arts classes. [CSL is available; consult index for page reference.] PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent; English majors.

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information: In this course, you will begin to prepare to teach writing at the secondary level.  You will do so by engaging in inquiry together around the central question of the course: What makes writing good?  Our inquiry will include reading about writing and the teaching of writing; examining examples of writing from professionals, secondary students, and each other; and, of course, writing ourselves.

655 – Literature & the Adolescent Reader

2016-2017 Bulletin: Analysis and evaluation of literature about and for adolescents. Teaching approach based on reader response theory. Required for students completing the Single Subject Waiver in English. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent. Course Attributes: Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities

Section 01 – James Gilligan | Detailed Information: Two central purposes inform the design of this complex course: to help you develop a broad familiarity with the genre of young adult (or adolescent) literature and to help you consider the teaching of literature to adolescents.  The course is designed with the presumption that everyone in the class shares a keen interest in adolescent literacy, adolescent development, and pedagogy.  Our work will focus on the following important questions: Who are adolescents? Why should adolescents read? How do the ways we teach reading influence the meaning students make from literature (and other texts)? What should adolescents read in school?  How can different theoretical approaches facilitate the study and teaching of Young Adult Literature (YAL)? Considering YAL as both “literary art and cultural artifact,” we will “evaluate YAL based on the complexity with which the author mobilizes and/or critiques adolescence as a social construct and depicts intersectionalities within youth experiences” (Sulzer & Thein, 2016, p. 169). Through microteaching assignments and group presentations, students will design the majority of class activities and engage in peer-facilitated lessons (i.e., students enrolled in this course will also function as instructors). 

688 – Assessment tin English Language Arts

2016-2017 Bulletin: Creation of an English Education e-Portfolio to demonstrate mastery of subject matter competency in English. Prerequisite: Senior standing and interview with English Single Subject Credntial adviser.

Section 01 – Paul Morris | Detailed Information

 

Linguistics

420 – Intro to Study of Language

2016-2017 Bulletin: Linguistic investigation of sounds, words, sentences, conversations. Relationships between language, culture, dialects, mind, animal communication examined. Recommended as first language structure course. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent.. Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities; Global Perspectives.

Section 01 – TBD | Detailed Information: An investigation of language patterns in sounds, words, sentences, conversations. We also explore language and culture, dialects, language and the mind. Highly recommended as a structure of language course for English majors, teachers, and others interested in language analysis

421 – The Structure of English

2016-2017 Bulletin: Introduction to contemporary syntactic theory and fundamentals of linguistic data analysis. Prerequisite: Upper division standing or ENG 420. Priority to English majors, minors, and MA TESOL and Linguistics students.

Section 01 – Anastasia Smirnova | Detailed Information: This is not a grammar class. Rather than learning proper punctuation and whether to split innitives, the study of syntax is concerned with explaining why native speakers have strong intuitions about what sounds \right." Traditional grammar classes may teach us not to end sentences with prepositions, but they do not need to warn against constructions like What do you like the man who sells? 1 Why not? Because we already know not to use them. Syntax is the study of why native speakers accept certain constructions as acceptable and reject others. What is the underlying structure that guides sentence formation in the world's languages? Linguists aim to nd the commonalities that unite human languages, and discover systematicities in the differences that divide them. 

422 – History of the English Language

2016-2017 Bulletin: The background, sources, and development of English; examinations of writing of historical periods of the language. Prerequisite: Upper division standing or ENG 420.

Section 01 – TBD | Detailed Information: In this course we will trace the origins of English from the inception of Proto-Indo European through Early Modern English. While we will consider and incorporate social, historical and literary influences of each era, there is a heavy emphasis on linguistic description of the various periods. The course is partly inductive in that we will be using Old, Middle and Early Modern English texts to uncover syntactic and morphological characteristics of each period. While not required, English 421 and 424 are highly recommended, 420 is recommended in the absence of 421 and 424. Grade is determined by exams, homework assignments and class participation.

423 – Language Analysis for Language Teachers

2016-2017 Bulletin: Introduction to English language structures and common English learner errors. Analysis of form, meaning and use in spoken and written texts, including academic genres. Focus on understanding cross-linguistic influences and strategies for responding to learner challenges in grammar and pronunciation. Prerequisite: Upper division standing or ENG 420.

Section 01 – David Olsher | Detailed Information:

424 – Phonology & Morphology

2016-2017 Bulletin: Theories and techniques of phonological and morphological analysis using data from English and other languages. Prerequisite: Upper division standing or ENG 420. Priority to ENG majors, minors, MA Linguistics and TESOL students.

Section 01 – Anastasia Smirnova | Detailed Information: This course will explore the nature of phonological and morphological phenomena in natural languages.

425 – Language in Context

2016-2017 Bulletin: Introduction to language variation relating to age, ethnicity, gender, region, class, occupation; language and culture; multilingualism. [CSL may be available; consult index for page reference.] Prerequisite: Upper division standing or ENG 420. Priority to English majors, minors, and MA Linguistics and TESOL students.

Section 01 – TBD | Detailed Information: This course looks at the ways in which various aspects of society influence language. Questions that will be explored include the following: How do factors such as age, ethnicity, region, social class, education, and occupation effect the way we talk? How does the way we talk effect the attitudes of those who listen to us? What is a pidgin language and how does it emerge? Does language shape culture or does culture shape language? What does it mean to be part of a speech or linguistic network? Why does cross-cultural and cross-gender miscommunication occur? Grading will be based on a final research project, two in-class exams and class participation.

 

Literature

230 – Literature and Film

2016-2017 Bulletin: The intersections of literature and film and textual forms. Focus on literary adaptation, narrative kinds, and close reading of all texts. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature.

Section 01 – William Christmas | Detailed Information: This course examines the relationship between literature and film by pairing selected literary texts with their filmic adaptations.  Our focus will be on close reading both literary and visual texts, and we will pay particular attention to those elements, techniques, and terminologies that both connect and separate film from literature.  Expect to read work by Shakespeare, Jane Austen, James Joyce, and one or two others in this context.  Major assignments include short analytical papers, and a final project in which students will work up a filmic treatment of a literary text of their choice.

251 – The Lyric Poem in English

2016-2017 Bulletin: Examination of a wide range of forms, styles, themes, and modes available in short lyric poetry. Detailed analysis of both form and content in the work of a variety of major and lesser-known poets. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Summer Star | Detailed InformationThe Lyric Poem In The Birth of Tragedy (1872), Friedrich Nietzsche traced the birth of ‘the lyric voice’ to the tragedies of Euripedes. As the Greek chorus formed a communal presence on stage, traditional from the great choric odes of Sophocles, a new phenomenon broke forth: a single speaker, a single voice rose up. For Nietzsche, this “I,” speaking at once deeply alone and for the subjective experience of all mankind, was the same resounding “I” that grew in volume and variety through the poetry of the following centuries. In the sound of one voice that gave voice to the deepest, most persistent experiences of all, the lyric voice – of William Shakespeare and John Donne, John Keats and Walt Whitman, Elizabeth Bishop and Louise Bogan, Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash – was born. The purpose of this course is to chart the development of the lyric voice and forms of lyric poetry through the works of 19th and 20th-century English language poets. How are the characteristics of the lyric mode revealed in these works – in their formal innovations and in your affective experience of them as readers? Despite differences in culture, era and argument, what qualities of voice unite these works as ‘lyrical’?

Lectures and discussion will focus equally on poetic form and terminology, methods of interpretation, and cultural context. Terms of poetic form and meter (the measure of poetic rhythm) will be taught in lecture, practiced in class and in homework, and tested at midterm. As music works with lyrics in any song you hear, meter, the careful timing and manipulation of rhythm in language, is the musical, physical counterpart of expression in poetry – and particularly prominent in the “lyric” poem. You will be asked to not only know these terms, but to use them in developing your understanding of poetic rhythm in written work for the class. Finally, you will, individually, be engaging in a serious and on-going creative encounter with the lyric voice. Whether in poetic or musical form, you will produce, revise, critically consider, and perform you own lyrics: experiencing personally the creative challenges and critical stakes of participating in lyric tradition.

The readings for this course will be distributed in class meetings and posted on iLearn. Course requirements include active class participation, one exam on poetic meter, two critical essays, one creative project, as well as 2 recitations of memorized poems.

252 – The Novel in English 

2016-2017 Bulletin: Major English and American novelists and variations in the genre between Defoe and the present. [Formerly ENG 152]. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Ellen Peel | Detailed Information: Giants, Lilliputians, a monster, and people who act monstrously; travels to the Alps, the Congo, and the (oddly familiar) State of Euphoria; satire, romance, science fiction, and letters to God, along with heart-breaking realism--all these await you in "The Novel in English."  We will read novels from three centuries and three continents: Gulliver's Travels, Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, Changing Places, The Color Purple, and The Bone People.  Films inspired by the novels will also be studied. 

Section 02 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information: A survey of the novel written in the English language from the Modernist to Postmodernist periods.  Exploration of varying genres including romantic comedy, the travel experience, historical fiction, and the epistolary novel.

Novels to be examined include:

  1. E.M. Forster, Room with A View
  2. Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room
  3. Henry Miller, Daisy Miller
  4. E.L. Doctorow, Ragtime
  5. Alice Walker, The Color Purple

In considering these novelists we will explore a number of sub-themes, topics and social issues including:

  • travelers abroad and the representation of the Mediterranean in the English and American imaginations
  • the national vs. the local
  • the construction of national vs. ethnic identity in the U.S. in the era of mass migration and the post civil rights era
  • immigration in the era of mass migration
  • U.S. feminism in the late 20th century
  • theories of the novel
  • what is historical fiction

255 - Contemporary Literature

2016-2017 Bulletin: Selected poetry, fiction, and drama of the late 19th century to the present. [Formerly ENG 155]. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 - Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information: In this course, we will read plays, short stories, novels, and essays by writers from 1945 to the present.  Our focus will be identity, particularly the ways in which identity is contingent and fluid. We will also discuss borders - physical, emotional, ethnic, racial, sexual, linguistic, national, and literary.  Texts will include Anna Deavere Smith’s play Fires in the Mirror, Bharati Mukherjee’s novel Jasmine, and Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir Fun Home. Students will hone their writing and close reading skills, participate in meaningful group work, and produce a final project that is analytical, creative, and performative in nature.

258 – American Literature

2016-2017 Bulletin: Selected masterpieces of American literature. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor.  Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Beverly Voloshin | Detailed Information: This will be a lively introductory course, open to all students. We will read a selection of great stories and poems, as well as some autobiographical and political texts, written in the US from the nineteenth century to the present. We will think about these texts as works of art engaged with their own times; we will place them in dialogue with each other; and we will consider how they might speak to us, now. We will also pose some questions inspired by the title of the course. What is literature? What is American literature? Why do we tend to link literature with the nation? Your regular attendance and participation are key (and will make up a portion of the grade). Frequent short writing assignments, group work, and a final. We will also have the opportunity to visit the American art collection at the de Young Museum and see some artworks that are related to our readings; this trip will be optional--and free.

259 – Introduction to Shakespeare

2016-2017 Bulletin: For potential English majors unacquainted with Shakespeare's work, and non-majors not yet conscious of themselves as heirs of Shakespeare's language and culture, and beneficiaries of his dramatic gifts. [Formerly ENG 159]. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: C3: Humanities: Literature

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information: Course texts: Julius Caesar, The Merchant of Venice, Macbeth, Hamlet, Othello. The course texts will occasionally be supplemented with audio recordings and videocassette tapes of Shakespeare's plays and lyrics. There will be some handouts of poetry and literary criticism related to Shakespearean drama. Some of the poetry will be only poets and dramatists of the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods.

429 – Stylistics

2016-2017 Bulletin: Analysis of syntax, diction, and other devices that contribute to what we call literary "style" in a variety of 19th and 20th century works of fiction and non-fiction.. PrerequisiteENG 114 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Margaret Schoerke | Detailed Information: What is style and how does it shape what a writer says?  We will explore this question through studying types and patterns of diction, figurative language (tropes), and sentences (schemes), and we will ground our study on an on-going review of English grammar and syntax.  The course will help students learn how to develop close readings of literary texts, ground those readings on stylistic analysis, and understand how “form” and “content” intertwine.  Along with honing stylistic analysis skills to understand the structure and rhetorical power of a variety of texts, students will cultivate style in their own writing through developing portfolios consisting of their own versions of tropes and schemes and imitations of great stylists.  English 429 fulfills the linguistics requirement for the English Literature major.

460 – Literature in English I: Beginnings through the 17th Century

2016-2017 Bulletin: Introduction to the history and aesthetics of influential Old English, Middle English, sixteenth- and seventeenth-century texts written in English and America. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Julie Paulson | Detailed Information: This course begins with earliest extant Old English poem, Caedmon’s Hymn, written in the seventh century. Covering a period of roughly one thousand years, the course highlights the most influential medieval and Renaissance literature, including Beowulf, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s Faerie Queene, and culminates with Milton’s seventeenth-century epic Paradise Lost. The Middle Ages is often imagined as a strange and distant period that came to an end with the onset of modernity. By contrast, the Renaissance is commonly understood to have ushered in the modern era, a period continuous with our own. Yet what makes us feel that Shakespeare is a part of our own era whereas the early-sixteenth-century play Everyman, composed seventy years or so before Shakespeare’s birth, is unmistakably medieval? This course will challenge us to account for the enormous changes we perceive in the cultures and literatures of late medieval and early modern England. Accordingly, we will take up questions surrounding how we write English literary history and the paradigms of thought (rupture, transformation, revolution, reform) that have characterized how we think about the transition between these periods. Teaching methods will include lecture, discussion, and small group work.

461 – Literature in English II: 18th and 19th Centuries

2016-2017 Bulletin: Introduction to the history and aesthetics of influential eighteenth- and nineteenth-century texts written in England and America. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Sara Hackenberg | Detailed Information: This survey course—along with “Literature in English” I and III—is designed to provide you with an overview of major developments in the history of literature written in English. In this class, we will examine texts from the 18th and 19th centuries written by authors from England, America, Ireland, Scotland, Canada, the West Indies, India, and Africa. Working from the premise that the study of genre development is the backbone of the study of literary history, we will navigate our rich sea of reading by using genre as a critical compass. To explore what literary forms were invented or used at what historical moments, in what ways, and by whom, is to begin to understand the history of literary expression. Texts and lectures/discussions will also engage three overlapping zones of literary inquiry, tracing some of the major developments, preoccupations, and concerns of “high” literary culture; newly burgeoning “media/ popular” culture; and “imperial” culture.

Section 02 – Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information: This survey course is designed to offer students a brief introduction to English and American literary history and aesthetics in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We will study some major texts of the period and the lines of influence that extend through them. The aim of this course is to provide you with a broad sense of the literary and cultural developments that took place during this period. 

462 – Literature in English III: The Twentieth Century

2016-2017 Bulletin: Survey of key texts, debates, and literary historical landmarks in the study of twentieth-century literature in English. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Michael Krasny | Detailed Information: This course surveys transatlantic literature of twentieth century and highlights the major contributions in all genres - fiction, poetry, and drama. Requirements include three short critical essays and a final exam. 

480 – Junior Seminar

2016-2017 Bulletin: Practical criticism; techniques in the art of reading literature and writing about it in a series of short papers. Majors must complete this course before the end of the junior year. (ABC/NC grading only). PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent with grade of C or better. English major (who must complete ENG 480 before the end of the junior year) and minor. Course Attributes: Graduation Writing Assessment

Section 01 – Angela Jones | Detailed Information: In this junior seminar students will develop reading, writing, and research practices that are fundamental to advanced literary study and everyday critical literacy. Students will examine the claims that different types of texts make on them and will use formal and informal writing assignments to analyze, synthesize, and interpret language. Biography, memoir, and personal essay are among the types of literature students will read and questions of what makes a text literary, historical, or aesthetically valuable will guide discussion.

Section 02 – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information: This Junior Seminar provides English majors with a foundation in the methods of detailed reading and analysis essential to the advanced study of literature. We will begin with prose (both short stories and novels from the 20th century) but will also cover a wide range of poetry and both classic and post-modern drama by the time our seminar is concluded. We will learn a critical vocabulary that will allow you to analyze literature in precise language. 

This class will focus on:

  1. Close reading: reading any given passage of text attentively and precisely,
  2. Interpretation:  integrating formal, generic and other analysis to interpret the text as a whole,
  3. Contextualization:  reading, understanding, and interpreting a text through relevant historical and cultural contexts.

We will develop these skills in a writing-intensive atmosphere.  Class discussion, informal class writing, short assignments, formal papers and paper revisions will each contribute to your development as an academic writer.  The Junior Seminar is designed to emphasize the skills necessary for critical reading and writing about literature.  The Junior Seminar is a GWAR course; as with all GWAR courses, students must receive a C or higher to fulfill the GWAR requirement.

Section 03 – Mary Soliday | Detailed Information: English 480: Junior Seminar introduces English majors to the habits of mind typical of English Studies; and it fulfills the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). To accomplish both aims, this section of 480 will focus on ways of reading and writing. Analysis is only one mode of reading and writing: we will consider other pleasurable modes as well, including an emphasis on integrating what you are learning in other English classes into this one.  We’ll spend part of the semester reading a long novel, and the rest on reading poetry; you will choose most of the poems we read, and some will be performed. You’ll write short pieces every week, and these will form the basis of class discussion; several classes will be devoted to writers’ workshops, where you will, among other things, select a weekly piece to develop into a culminating, and creative, essay that richly interprets a literary text in your own, genuine voice. Required texts at the SF State Bookstore include the Broadview edition of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles and a poetry anthology.

Section 04 – Lynn Wardley | Detailed Information: This course aims to engage and develop your skills as a close reader of fiction.  Our texts include stories by Kate Chopin, Sherman Alexie, Jamaica Kincaid, Willa Cather, and Charles Chesnutt; novels by Frank Norris and Robert Louis Stevenson; and one play. There will be much discussion; short assignments on works of literary criticism; and several formal essays.

503 – Studies in Medieval Literature: Chaucer’s Women

2016-2017 Bulletin: Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, work, or issue in Medieval literature. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Julie Paulson | Detailed Information: The sixteenth-century Scottish poet Gavin Douglas famously wrote that Chaucer “was ever, God wait, wemenis frend” (“was ever, God knows, a friend to women”). Chaucer and “the woman question”—how Chaucer thought about the role and nature of women—has been of abiding interest to his readers. In this course, we will read some of Chaucer’s most famous works with a focus on how he represented women, gender issues and stereotypes, and power relations between men and women. In doing so, the course will also introduce students to the social, cultural, political, and religious contexts of Chaucer’s writing; familiarize students with literary critical approaches to Chaucer’s poetry, especially feminist ones; and develop students’ research, critical thinking, and writing skills. No prior knowledge of medieval literature required. 

514 – Age of the Romantics

2016-2017 Bulletin: Poetry and prose of Blake, Coleridge, Byron, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats.. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information: This class will explore what is distinctive about the literature of the Romantic writers and how their writings respond to the political and cultural climates of England and Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.  We will examine how the Romantics address concerns that are still important to us, and in doing so, gain a better understanding not only of ourselves but also of the various ways in which literature and the past continue to speak to our present. 

521 – Studies in 20th Century English Literature: Contemporary British Fiction

2016-2017 Bulletin: Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, work, or issue in 20th c. English literature. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information: The course will include some highly esteemed writers such as Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Graham Swift, Angela Carter, Salman Rushdie, and Zadie Smith, as well as up-and-coming talents such as Nicola Barker, Monica Ali, and A.L. Kennedy. We will discuss trends including neo-realism and historiographic metafiction, and investigate "postcolonial" contributions to "British" fiction.

526 – Age of the American Renaissance: 1830-1860

2016-2017 Bulletin: Achievement of a national literature in the works of such writers as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Frederick Douglass, with reading of earlier authors. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.  Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities; Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities; Social Justice.

Section 01 – Lynn Wardley | Detailed Information: Readings from the "Age of the American Renaissance" will include Moby-Dick, or, the Whale (our biggest book), Dickinson's poetry (our tiniest texts), and works in-between by Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Stowe, and Douglass. Texts read in their political and cultural contexts, with an emphasis on representations of the home and the sea; animals, vegetables, and minerals; health and wellness; human rights; freedom and fate. Quizzes; mid-term and final examinations; paper or presentation.

527 – American Literature: 1860-1914

2016-2017 Bulletin: Major American writing from romanticism to realism and naturalism: Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Kate Chopin, Henry Adams, Edwin Arlington Robinson, Edith Wharton, and Theodore Dreiser. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information: This is a lecture-discussion course involving the study of prose and poetry. Authors to be discussed in this class include Samuel Clemens, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Henry James, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate Chopin, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, W.E.B. DuBois, Stephen Crane, Jack London, and Theodore Dreiser. 

One focus of the course will be an historical perspective upon American Literature. We will study the relationship of the growth of literary forms to major social, economic, and political changes, of which there were many period 1860-1914 (between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of WWI). Six hundred thousand soldiers died in the Civil War, which cost several billions of dollars. Despite the enormous depletion of human and material resources which was the consequence of the war, the engineering of the movement of men and material became technologically advanced because warfare had necessitated this development. Thus, the way was prepared for the completion of four transcontinental railroad lines by 1885. The invention of the refrigerated railway car facilitated the centralization of meat-packing industry in Chicago. Metropolitan areas saw burgeoning population growth as cities became the hub of trade and industry. Furthering the population explosion in the cities was large-scale immigration (for example, to New York) from Europe. This was the period in which America ceased to be mainly a country of farms, villages, and little towns. By the end of World War I half of the American citizenry lived in about a dozen cities. Factories and large corporations now had the majority of American workers. Moreover, power lay in the hands of the owners and managers of big businesses, particularly in meat-packing, oil, steel, and railroads. Political corruption was rampant; men, women, and children worked under very disagreeable conditions, and received low wages; labor unions were still in the future; and the right to strike did not become a reality until the 1930s. 

528 – American Literature: 1914-1960

2016-2017 Bulletin: Stories, drama, and criticism by such authors as Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Wallace Stevens, Robert Lowell, and Sylvia Plath. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Larry Hanley | Detailed Information: This course will survey representative movements, figures and periods in modern U.S. literature.   We’ll get a running start with a quick look at the fin-de-siecle crisis of American culture (DuBois, Adams, Marti, and Perkins Gilman) and then move on to variants of modernism.  These include modernism in the American grain ( Masters, Lindsay, Sandburg, Frost, Millay, Williams), modernism in exile (Eliot, Stein, Pound, Hemingway, Dos Passos) and the Harlem Renaissance (Locke, Hughes, Toomer, Hurston, Larsen, Brown).  We will pass through the radicalized writing of the 1930s (Gold, Conroy, Rolfe, Wright, Olsen, Le Sueur) and then conclude with a foray into post-war and Cold War writing in the United States (Miller, Ginsberg, Lowell, Plath).  The pace will be swift; the pleasures will be immense.

535 – Literature and Ecology

2016-2017 Bulletin: An appraisal of literary works in light of their representation of nature and their ecological wisdom. Examples of post-romantic American literature of nature. The theory and practice of ecocriticism. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities; Environmental Sustainability

Section 01 – Angela Jones | Detailed Information: The readings for this course examine American writers’ individual relationships to the natural world and to human communities shaped by the environment.  Our core text, American Earth, assembles nature writing from Thoreau to the present and enables readers to trace the complex evolution of human interactions with and attitudes toward the natural world.  We will also read authors whose solo encounters with nature shaped their identities and life trajectories.  Moving beyond the familiar binary of human vs. nature, the readings for this course invite us to rethink who we are in the wider world, how we define nature, and how we create community. 

553 – Classic American Novel

2016-2017 Bulletin: Major novelists from Brown and Cooper through Twain, Howells, James, Wharton, Stephen Crane, and Dreiser--including Chopin, Davis, local colorists, Johnson, and Douglas. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Lynn Wardley | Detailed Information: In this course we will read important American novels that concern what Gertrude Stein called "the American thing [that] is the vitality of movement." Novels about Americans in motion will include Franklin's Autobiography, James's Daisy Miller, Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Chopin's The Awakening, Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Wright's Native Son, Toomer's Cane, Larsen's Quicksand, Robinson's Housekeeping, and Bechdel's  Fun Home.

559 – Middle and Late Twentieth Century Poetry in the United States

2016-2017 Bulletin: Development of poetry during the second half of the 20th century; poets' reactions against and development of modernist themes and techniques. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information: A survey of American poets from 1950 to the present day including Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Robert Lowell, Theodore Roethke, Denise Levertov, Nikki Giovanni, Alice Walker, Bob Dylan, James Merrill, Maya Angelou, Jorie Graham, Alejandro Murguia, and Tryfon Tolides.

In considering these poets, we will explore a number of sub-themes, topics and social issues including:

  • poetry and resistance
  • the national vs. the local
  • poetry and gender
  • American ethnicities and the construction of identity
  • diaspora and transnationalism
  • poetry and music (the folk song, the "art song" and commercial music)
  • literary value and taste
  • canon formation and literary schools (poets grouped under a common poetic practice)

565 – The Short Story: Global Literature in English

2016-2017 Bulletin: The short story as distinctive literary phenomenon of global literature in English, examined in relation to cultural perspectives and literary-historical traditions. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: Global Perspectives

Section 01 – Geoffrey Green | Detailed Information: This course will be a mix of lecture and discussion. We will necessarily talk about the relationship between historical events, different cultural perspectives, and the short story form in global literature in English. Using short stories from a variety of cultures, traditions, perspectives, and literary styles, we will explore the uniqueness of cultural difference as well as the transcendence of general human qualities across cultures, time, and tradition. 

571 – Shakespeare’s Rivals

2016-2017 Bulletin: Close study of the drama of Shakespeare's contemporaries and immediate successors. Class will combine modes of literary analysis with theatrically-informed approaches. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: E1: Lifelong Learning Develop

Section 01 – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information: Shakespeare’s Rivals focuses on the best works of provocative drama by the writers who were Shakespeare’s confederates, competitors, and heirs: John Webster, Thomas Middleton, Philip Massinger, and more. This course is filled with pointed revenge, forbidden love, gruesome violence, and shocking meta-theatrical moments that rival post-modern theater. How do you possibly one-up Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet? If you’re John Ford, you write a romantic tragedy in which the forbidden lovers are actually brother and sister! Plays will be studied both textually (with literary analysis) and theatrically (with acting and directing exercises). You do not need acting talent, but a willingness to try multiple analytical strategies and to read aloud is recommended. This course fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for majors AND the Life Long Learning and Development requirement for all students.  This course does NOT fulfill the Shakespeare requirement. Students will ideally have already completed English 460, English 480 GWAR, and the Shakespeare required before registering for Shakespeare’s Rivals.

580 – Individual Authors

2016-2017 Bulletin: Rotating course on a specific author, or group of authors, in British, American, or Global literatures of any period. Topic to be specified in the Class Schedule. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: ENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 Hurston & Hughes – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information: In 1930, Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes began writing Mule Bone, a comedy about black life that would serve as an antidote to decades of demeaning theatrical depictions of African Americans in vaudeville and minstrelsy.  However, conflicts between Hurston and Hughes prevented the play from being published and performed in its entirety until 1991, long after the deaths of these two Harlem Renaissance luminaries.  The play, which bears the imprint of both Hurston and Hughes, serves as a starting point for our semester-long discussion of the lives and works of these two stellar writers. We will read some of the major works of Hurston and Hughes with the following questions in mind: What links Hurston and Hughes artistically and politically? What separates them? In particular, how do Hurston and Hughes address issues of race, color, class, gender, and sexuality in their works? What are their respective legacies in African American and American literature and culture? We will read closely, write frequently, and discuss vigorously as we explore the connections between these two important authors.

Section 02 Melville – Beverley Voloshin | Detailed Information: This is a course in the works of Herman Melville, one of the great writers of the nineteenth century. Readings include TypeeMoby-DickBenito CerenoThe Confidence ManBilly Budd, as well as some short stories and poems and selections from Melville's long (and little-read) narrative poem, Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land. We will look at the arc of Melville's career. We will look at Melville's work in the context of commerce, travel, colonialism, race, slavery, labor, ideas of the nation, the emerging world system, friendship, erotic love--among other topics. We will discuss Melville's engagement with philosophy, from the ancients to the moderns; with contemporary and older writers; with the materiality of the book. All of this with an eye to the relation between theme, style, and form. 

Section 03 The Brontes – Summer Star | Detailed InformationBrontës: The Life, Literature & Myths of Haworth Parsonage The Brontë sisters – Charlotte, Emily, and Anne – were surrounded by myth even while they lived. Three socially awkward unmarried sisters, peeling potatoes and writing poetry by a modest clergyman’s hearth in Yorkshire, by turns seeking and dodging work as governesses and teachers – such women couldn’t have been farther from how literary London imagined "Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell." These pen-names that were meant to protect their creative world from public notoriety quickly accomplished the opposite.

In this course, we’ll encounter the literature and legacies of the Brontë’s imaginations in diverse ways: reading selections from biographies of the Brontë family, as well as the poetry, juvenilia and novels of Charlotte, Emily and Anne.

Requirements for the course include thorough reading of all assigned texts, participation in class discussion, a 5-6 page paper on Wuthering Heights or The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall, a 3 page paper on Jane Eyre, a final 7-8 page paper on Villette, and a “myth and medium” presentation in the last week and a half of the semester.

Course Texts: The Brontës: Wild Genius on the Moors: The Story of Three Sisters, by Juliet Barker; Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë; The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë; Jane Eyre and Villette by Charlotte Brontë; short readings in hand-out format or posted on iLearn as assigned. 

Section 04 Virginia Woolf – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information: An intensive study of Woolf's major novels and essays. We will consider Woolf's position in the modernist canon, and her significance for feminist literary study.

581 – Jane Austen

2016-2017 Bulletin: Lecture/discussion course on the complete works of Jane Austen. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities

Section 01 – William Christmas | Detailed Information: This course is devoted to an in-depth study of both Austen's achievement as a novelist and the role(s) her novels and authorial persona continue to play within contemporary popular culture.  We shall read an example of Austen's juvenilia and her six published novels closely focusing on a wide variety of aesthetic and thematic topics.  In addition, we will discuss various modern forms of Austenian adaptation, from feature film scenes to children’s books.  Students will also contribute to an ongoing digital humanities project by writing scholarly annotations for a specific Austen novel, and publishing their work on our “Annotating Austen” website.  Written work will include several short papers and an end-of-semester critical/creative project.

583 – Shakespeare: Representative Plays

2016-2017 Bulletin: Shakespeare and his age; his development as a dramatist and his literary, intellectual, and social milieu. Reading of representative comedies, histories, and tragedies as well as some non-dramatic poetry. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: E1: Lifelong Learning Develop

Section 01 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information: This course is designed to introduce students to a range of representative plays—comedies, tragedies, romances and ‘problem plays’—from the Shakespearean corpus. Through close readings (and occasional film screenings) of representative plays, we will explore a range of topics related to Shakespearean drama. In the course of the semester, we will acquaint ourselves with the society and culture in which these plays were created, the theatrical context in which they were performed, and the historical processes by which they have come down to us. Some of the following questions will inform our discussions: How is gender negotiated on the Shakespearean stage? How is religious difference performed? How is the body subject to discipline and punishment? How are representations of the body linked with emerging discourses of nationhood, race, class, and sexuality in early modern England? Plays will include The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Othello, and The Tempest.

584 – Shakespeare: Selected Plays

2016-2017 Bulletin: Study of a few plays in relation to the textual problems, dramatic technique, and problems of interpretation. Analysis of language, imagery, and structure. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Lois Lyles | Detailed Information: Study of dramatic technique and problems of interpretation (such as those arising from issues of national identity, gender identity, eroticism, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status). About five of Shakespeare’s plays, including Hamlet and Macbeth will be studied. Analysis will be made of Shakespeare’s rhythmic structures, imagery, metaphors, dramatic structure, and characteristic themes. A midterm and a final examination will be given in this class, and there will be two papers required.

601 – Literature and Psychology

2016-2017 Bulletin: Selected fiction and drama which reflect the artist's perception of human motivation and behavior. Application of theories of personality to the writer's art. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities

Section 01 – Geoffrey Green | Detailed InformationPsychoanalysis, Identity, Paranoia, and the Crisis of the Self. Over 75 years ago, Freud wrote, “Where the It was, there the I shall be.”  Contemporary esthetic-cultural theory has adopted Freud’s work as a metaphor to express important new ideas: psychology of creativity, of writing, of reading, of conscious-unconscious language, of imaginary vs. real time, sexual difference, dreams, desire, power, self and the other. Students will examine Freud’s ideas in relation to the arts and their implications.  The focus of this lecture-discussion format class will be on the interaction of identity, paranoia, and the crisis of the self in culture. Literary-cultural texts include works by: Sigmund Freud; Jacques Lacan; Sidney Lumet; Henry James; Vladimir Nabokov; Oscar Wilde; Caryl Churchill; Alfred Hitchcock; Rudolf Mate; Fritz Lang; August Wilson; Yazmina Reza; Orson Welles; Roman Polanski.

611 – Modern Criticism

2016-2017 Bulletin: Examination of critical approaches including the formalist and the psychoanalytic. Application of one or more critical methods to works of imaginative literature. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Wai-Leung Kwok | Detailed Information: Through a close reading of selected texts in literature and criticism, we will examine how the phenomenon of "literature" and the notion of "literariness" have been defined and characterized in modern times. Among the topics we will be exploring together: the relationships between literature and history, literature and ethics, literature and politics; the ontology of the literary work; the debates over canonization; the polemic over feminist criticism and cultural criticism; the responsibility of the intellectual as literary scholar, critic, and teacher. 

614 – Women in Literature: Authors and Characters

2016-2017 Bulletin: Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, or issue focused on literature and/or criticism by women writers of any period. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Sara Hackenberg | Detailed Information:The Victorian Era (1830s to the early 1900s) saw the birth of modern feminism: women started working outside the domestic sphere; Victoria Woodhull became the first female candidate for President of the United States; abolitionists and suffragettes became social forces. It was also a time of increasingly rigid gender ideologies (“angels” vs. “fallen” women) and vigorous debates about the “woman question.” This class, "Victorian Women: Agents of Change," which fulfills the Theory/Criticism requirement for English Literature Majors, will engage the “women question(s)” of the nineteenth century—many of which are still being asked today—by reading a selection of “sensational” fictions, political poetry, and personal narratives by British and American women. 

Primary readings include Bronte’s Jane Eyre; Howe’s “The Hermaphrodite”; Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret; Alcott’s “Behind a Mask”; Southworth’s Capitola the Madcap, Crafts’ The Bondwoman’s Narrative; Hopkins’s Hagar’s Daughter, and poetry/essays by Bates, Browning, Craik, Dickinson, Eliot, Hale, Levy, and more. We will consider a selection of contemporary essays and criticism about Victorian women and engage in our own “recovery” research project with the help of SFSU Library’s Special Collections.

Section 02 – Sarita Cannon | Detailed Information: While questioning our assumptions about two ostensibly straightforward terms – “WOMEN” and “LITERATURE” -- we will also examine how gendered identities intersect with sexual, racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic identities in four coming-of-age narratives: Toni Morrison’sSula; Bharati Mukherjee’s Jasmine; Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; and Helena Maria Viramontes’ Under the Feet of Jesus.  In addition, we will read the work of a wide range of feminist theorists, including Virginia Woolf, Monique Wittig, Barbara Christian, and Chandra Talpade Mohanty. (Note that this course fulfills the Theory/Criticism requirement for English Literature Majors). There will also be room for students to consider how questions raised by women writers resonate in their own lives and in popular culture. (Beyoncé’s Lemonade may be mandatory viewing). Requirements include several analytical papers, active participation in class, and a final project in which each student writes and performs a monologue from the perspective of one of the feminist critics studied during the semester.

615 – Imagery, Metaphor, and Symbol

2016-2017 Bulletin: Relationship between symbolic process and organic form in literature. Symbolism as meta-language. Controlled patterning, tonal modulation, shadow structure, and mythic resonance. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities

Section 01 – Margaret Schoerke | Detailed Information: We'll spend the semester examining the variety and effects of different types of figurative language.  After first considering the power of metaphor in everyday life, we will move on to literary examples from a wide range of genres.  As a course that fulfills the theory requirement for the English Literature major, English 615 will explore a variety of theoretical approaches to figurative language and then apply those approaches to selections from an eclectic poetry anthology, Ted Hughes and Seamus Heaney's The Rattle Bag; some parables, fables, and short stories; the Medieval morality play Everyman; Art Spiegelman's Maus; Jean Toomer's Cane; and Ursula Le Guin's The Left Hand of Darkness.  Grading will likely be based on a short essay, a mid-term, a research assignment, a final essay, and on creative exercises in which students develop their own versions of tropes such as epic simile and parable.

630 – Selected Studies

2016-2017 Bulletin: Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, genre, or issue in literature from a variety of national traditions and/or historical periods. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated when topics vary. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 Detective Fiction – Sara Hackenberg | Detailed Information: G.K. Chesterton once asserted that the detective story "is the earliest and only form of popular literature in which is expressed some sense of the poetry of modern life," while Gertrude Stein even more grandly pronounced the detective story to be "the only real-ly modern novel form that has come into existence."  This course explores the development, popularity, "poetry," and modernity of detective fiction, moving from its "modern" origins in the 1840s to our modern present day.  Authors include: Mary Elizabeth Brad-don, Raymond Chandler, G.K. Chesterton, Agatha Christie, Wilkie Collins, Arthur  Conan Doyle, Sue Grafton, Anna Katherine Green, Dashiell Hammett, the Baroness Or-czy, Edgar Allan Poe, Dorothy Sayers, Gertrude Stein, and George Thompson.

Section 02 Literature of Labor – Larry Hanley | Detailed Information

“Don’t you go a-sassin’ me.  I ‘member you.  You’re one of these here troublemakers.”

“Damn right,” said Tom.  “I’m bolsheviky.”

            - - John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath

The most productive and powerful years of John Steinbeck’s literary career, starting with his first novel, Cup of Gold (1929), and ending with his magnum opus, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), coincide almost perfectly with the decade of the Great Depression.  This course will explore the wellsprings of Steinbeck’s narratives within the social, cultural, and literary contexts of the 1930s.  These contexts include: the 1934 San Francisco General Strike, class war in the factories and fields of California, migration narratives, documentary photography, the proletarian novel, and popular film.  What will emerge, hopefully, is a better understanding of Steinbeck’s novels as audacious attempts to bend literary representation to the exigencies of history. Much of your work in the class will be project-centered.

Our reading list includes (but is not restricted to): John SteinbeckTortilla Flat (1935), InDubious Battle (1936), and The Grapes of Wrath (1939); Jack Conroy, The Disinherited (1933); Chester Himes, If He Hollers Let Him Go (1945); Dorothea Lange and Paul Taylor, American Exodus (1940); Woody Guthrie, Dust Bowl Ballads (1940); The Wizard of Oz (1939); Nathaniel West, Day of the Locust (1939).

631 – Post-Colonial Literature in English

2016-2017 Bulletin: Contemporary literature in English by writers from former Third World colonies. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities; Global Perspectives

Section 01 – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information: This course explores the myriad forms of self-fashioning delineated in the postcolonial novel.  What are the forces—historical, cultural, and political—that shape postcolonial identities in all their complexities?  How are these identities inflected in terms of gender, class, and ethnicity?  Through an examination of works by a range of postcolonial writers, we will engage with the literary representation, mediation, and construction of these identities.  We will especially consider issues related to the legacy of colonialism, the shadow of nationalism, the search for roots and routes, and the complex nature of postcolonial modernities, as they are dealt with in these works.  Authors covered in the course will include Salman Rushdie, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Jamaica Kincaid, Jhumpa Lahiri, Julia Alvarez, and Mohsin Hamid.

Section 02 – Kathleen De Guzman | Detailed Informaiton: This course will focus on Caribbean novels, poetry, and essays. The Caribbean represented fantasies of exoticism, paradise, and savagery to its colonizers. At the same time, some of the most far-reaching and nuanced critiques of empire emerge from Caribbean intellectual and imaginative thought—from the colonized. The underlying question of the course therefore asks, what is the relationship between literature and politics? We will pose this question as we learn about the Caribbean and study material ranging from classic Caribbean novels from the 1950s and 1960s to pop culture icons such as Bob Marley and Rihanna.

636 – Greek and Roman Myth and Modern Literature

2016-2017 Bulletin: Contemporary writers of fiction, poetry, and drama who use subjects and themes from classical Greek and Roman mythology. PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Martha Klironomos | Detailed Information: As this is a 600 level course (one step below the Master's level), students should have already taken at least one lower-division literature course.

In this course, we will look at the appeal of Greek and Roman myth to Anglo American, European and African writers from the 20th to 21st centuries.

In discussing these writers in relation to classical reception, we will look at a few representative ancient texts including excerpts from Homer, fragments of Stesichoros, and plays by Aeschylus.

Writers to be explored include:

  • William Butler Yeats
  • H.D.
  • Ezra Pound
  • T.S. Eliot
  • James Joyce
  • C.P. Cavafy
  • Seamus Heaney
  • Wole Soyinka
  • Margaret Atwood
  • Anne Carson

690 – Senior Seminar

2016-2017 Bulletin: Rotating course on a specific topic, theme, literary form, historical period, or theoretical tradition in British, American, or Global literatures. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. Intensive study of a literary topic culminating in a research paper. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 480GW with a grade of C or better; or consent of instructor; priority enrollment given to English literature and English education majors in their senior year.

Section 01 Devils and Angels – Jennifer Mylander | Detailed Information: Devils and Angels focuses on the representation of devils and angels, in poetry, prose, and drama as well as in visual art and film. The semester is split between edgy contemporary texts and ground-breaking early modern works. Where else might you explore pop culture representations like classic Twilight Zone episodes alongside the best of literature like Paradise Lost? Senior Seminar is a capstone course asking all students to apply a range of methodologies learned over in the course of the major in a small, writing intensive seminar. All Senior Seminars culminate with research papers, so expect to use your existing research skills and to develop new ones as you produce one of the best portfolios of your undergraduate career. Expect active discussion and authentic inquiry in a Tuesday night, once a week seminar. This course fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for majors. Students must have successfully completed English 480 GWAR to enroll and should ideally have completed English 460 before registering for Devils and Angels.

Section 02 The Bard and Bollywood – Gitanjali Shahani | Detailed Information: This course is designed to help students understand Shakespeare as a global entity, performed, adapted, and translated into different cultural and artistic traditions.  Through close readings of Shakespeare’s plays and screenings of film adaptations, we will theorize and historicize the place of the Bard in Bollywood, Hollywood, and other cinematic forms.  We will variously explore Shakespeare in Japanese Noh style performance, Bollywood dance sequences, and high school USA teen movies.  We will consider some of the following issues: How is Shakespeare globalized and localized in different adaptations?  How do adaptations negotiate Shakespeare as high culture and popular culture?  How does Shakespeare emerge as a global brand through the process of adaptation and appropriation?  Plays will include Macbeth, Othello, Hamlet, and Taming of the Shrew; films will include Throne of BloodHaider, and O, among others.

Section 03 Steinbeck – Larry Hanley | Detailed Informaiton:

 

Technical & Professional Writing

400GW – Fundamentals of Technical and Professional Writing – GWAR

2016-2017 Bulletin: Forms, methods, standards, and issues central to the work of career writers. Students produce technical instructions, reports, promotions, and correspondence. (ABC/NC grading only.) PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent with grade of C or better. Course Attributes: Graduate Writing Assessment.

Section 01 – Louise Rehling | Detailed Information:

470 – Writing Professional Promotions

2016-2017 Bulletin: Developing documents for corporate communications, marketing, public relations, and development purposes. High-tech and non-profit applications. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent with grade of C or better; TPW student or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Megan Little | Detailed Information:

490 – Grantwriting

2016-2017 Bulletin: Practice in grant proposal writing and research. Requests from private non-profit organizations to various funding agencies. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) [CSL may be available; consult Index for page reference.] PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent with grade of C or better; TPW student or consent of instructor. Course Attributes: Social Justice.

Section 01 – Regina Neu | Detailed Information:

550 – Professional Editing

2016-2017 Bulletin: Expectations for professional editing in the workplace. Development of specialized projects; practice in relevant techniques; application of professional skills, standards, ethics, and methods. Review of grammar, punctuation, and usage. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent with grade of C or better; TPW student or consent of instructor

Section 01 – Louise Rehling | Detailed Information:

555 – Visual Rhetoric and Document Design

2016-2017 Bulletin: Principles of design and visual rhetoric; application of those principles in document design. Workshop teaches publication design software. Required laboratory. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) PrerequisiteENG 214 or equivalent with grade of C or better; TPW student or consent of instructor

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

600 – Individual and Team Writing

2016-2017 Bulletin: Developing professional skills for project management, research, group work, genre analysis, writing, editing production, and presentation. Individual projects explore current tools, trends, and technologies. Teams develop professional materials for local non-profits. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) [CSL may be available; consult index for page reference.] Prerequisite: TPW 400, TPW 550, and TPW 555 with grades of C or better.

Section 01 – Louise Rehling | Detailed Information:

695 – Internship in Technical and Professional Writing

2016-2017 Bulletin: Develop resume and portfolio. Practice job search and interviewing skills. Field experience: professional writing or editing, including structured supervision and evaluation by program faculty and placement sponsor. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) Prerequisite: Five TPW core or skill elective courses (all with grades of C or better), including TPW 400, TPW 550, and TPW 555.

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

699 – Independent Study

2016-2017 Bulletin: Special study in some aspect of technical and professional writing, performed under program faculty supervision. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 units. Prerequisite: Five TPW core or skills elective courses, all with grades of C or better, including TPW 400, TPW 550, and TPW 555. Enrollment requires consent of TPW instructor.

Section 01 – Neil Lindeman | Detailed Information:

 

Graduate

Composition

700 – Composition Theory (Introduction to Composition Studies)

2016-2017 Bulletin: Issues of composition theory, research, and classroom practice. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program.

Section 01 – Robert Kohls | Detailed Information: The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the scholarly field known as “composition studies.” Yes, there is such a thing. Although often primarily concerned with the teaching of writing in school contexts, composition studies (or, as it is sometimes called, “writing studies”) is more generally concerned with written discourse as a phenomenon. By the end of this course, you will not know everything there is to know about the field, but you will have a broad understanding of the theoretical frameworks and pedagogical approaches that have come to occupy scholars and teachers over the past few decades.

Why bother? Most of you are here, probably, because you want to become writing teachers. For much of the twentieth century, composition teachers got by on what Stephen North has called “lore,” or techniques and practices for teaching writing that was handed down from instructor to instructor. Many of these techniques worked, in that they seemed to improve student writing in some way, but such lore will always be too idiosyncratic to be systematic. Then, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, scholars began to theorize the teaching of writing in ways that we will explore in this course. Our aim, then, is to examine the various theories and approaches that enable much more informed and systematic teaching of writing.

But figuring out “what works” is only half the battle. In addition to preparing you to become a writing teacher, this course’s aim is to prepare you to become a scholar in the field of composition studies. There is a complex relationship between being a teacher and being a scholar, but the main purpose of doing both is so that you can become reflective practitioners—teachers who not only know what to do, but why they are doing it, and have the flexibility to adjust their teaching as the situation calls for it. By listening in on scholarly conversations in the field, and by joining in those conversations, you will prepare yourself to make informed pedagogical choices in your own future teaching.

701 – Reading Theory

2016-2017 Bulletin: Review of research on the physiological, psychological, and linguistic processes involved in developing literacy skills on the community college and college levels; examination of the relationships between reading and writing competencies, and reading and reasoning strategies. (See index for repeat policy.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Sugie Goen-Salter | Detailed Information: ENG 701 introduces students to key theoretical perspectives that help us understand reading processes of the adult learner. The major emphasis will be on how these theoretical understandings can be used to influence college-level reading instruction, with a secondary emphasis on the reading/writing connection.

704 – Pedagogical Grammar (Responding to Writing)

2016-2017 Bulletin: Theory and practice of responding to linguistic, stylistic, and rhetorical issues in student writing. (Plus-minus letter grade only.) Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program.

Section 01 – Mary Soliday | Detailed Information: This course focuses on the theory and practice of responding to linguistic, stylistic, and rhetorical issues in student writing.   

710 – Curriculum Design

2016-2017 Bulletin: Theory and practice of designing post-secondary reading and composition courses. Prerequisite: Admission to MA Composition Program or to Composition or Post-Secondary Reading Certificate Program; ENG 704 or 709 with grade of B or better.

Section 01 – Mark Roberge | Detailed Information: This class introduces students to the theory and practices needed to design required college-level writing courses, including:  overall course design, writing and sequencing assignments, responding to student writing, pedagogies that address diverse student needs, and acting as reflective practitioners of writing instruction.  Some observation of writing instruction may be required, depending on your experience.

The approach we will use in this class is highly self-reflective and student-centered.  Much of the success of this class is thus in your hands.  You will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and in small-group conversations about the readings for the week.   You will be invited to continually revise and refine your own ideas and pedagogical methods throughout the term.  And you will engage in activities that will be crucial to you as a teacher:  sharing your work, reflecting on your successes and challenges, engaging with disciplinary tools (such as textbooks), and integrating theoretical concepts with pedagogical incarnations of those ideas.

Because this class asks you to create – not merely replicate – theoretically sound practices and to integrate your knowledge of composition, literacy, and students (sometimes without much actual teaching experience), you should be prepared to consistently reflect on, rethink, and revise both your beliefs and your materials in an ongoing way throughout the term.  To do this you must remain open to new ideas, flexible to adaptation, connected to the possibilities inherent in other approaches or ways of thinking.  And you must support your colleagues in doing the same.  710 requires a lot of “hard thinking,” as many students put it; you’ll need stamina, fortitude, and creativity to create thoughtful and cohesive materials that you’ll be excited to try out with students!

715 – Reading Pedagogy

2016-2017 Bulletin: Theory-into-practice course in which students develop lesson plans for teaching basic literacy skills. Requires 2 hours of tutoring per week in the English Tutoring Center of IRW students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Jennifer Trainor | Detailed Information: Seminar in Pedagogy and Practice of Postsecondary Reading combines theory and specific techniques in reading instruction for teaching inexperienced readers and other adult learners at the college and university levels. In particular, we will focus on how to teach stand-alone reading courses.  Through readings and hand-on activities, students learn to develop instructional plans to assist students with specific reading/basic-literacy skills. In addition, class participants will research and report on areas of particular professional or practical interest and develop a unit plan which incorporates strategies for effective reading.

895 – Field Study

2016-2017 Bulletin: Field study or research project incorporating application of knowledge and techniques acquired in the student's program of study. (CR/NC grading only) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, adviser, department chair, and committee; approval of Advancement to Candidacy (ATC) and Culminating Experience (CE) forms by Graduate Studies.

Section 01 – Jennifer Trainor | Detailed Information: English 895 is not so much a course as it is a space for you to collect, revise, and reflect on materials for your culminating experience portfolio, which will satisfy your final requirements for the MA in composition. Though there will be some common assignments and readings, the majority of this course will focus on sharing and workshopping the various items that will go into your portfolio. Your overall aim is to produce a portfolio that best represents what you have learned and experienced in this program. 

 

English Education

714 – Curriculum & Instruction II

2016-2017 Bulletin: Applied theory, curriculum design, instruction, and assessment methods for teaching English language, literature, oral and written performance; grades 6-12. (AB/NC grading only.) Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 713 with grade of B or better. Must be taken concurrently with S ED 660/S ED 760, Student Teaching.

Section 01 – James Gilligan | Detailed Information: This second semester of curriculum and instruction in English is designed to give you opportunities to examine and reflect on your own instructional practices while student teaching in the classroom. The general question that will guide our inquiry together is, "How do we know we are teaching well for all students?" We will focus on assessing student learning and revising our teaching in light of the California English Language Arts Framework and Content Standards together with relevant learning theory, pedagogical research, and “best practices” as available from current journals and publications in the field. The course includes approaches for teaching English Language Learners (ELL) and students from other special populations, as well as emphasizing the use of information technology in the secondary and middle school English classroom.

Little of our time together this semester will be in full-class discussion; instead, you will work with an assigned seminar group to discuss the readings, your experiences teaching, and the work samples that each of you brings to class.  We will come back together after each seminar session to share what we have learned as a whole class, and we will also have workshops and small-group work with members of other seminar groups.

 

Literature

744 – Seminar: Literature and Psychology

2016-2017 Bulletin: Contributions of depth psychology to the understanding of selected works of literature. Pre- or co-requisiteENG 741 or consent of instructor.

Section 0 1- Geoffrey Green | Psychoanalysis, Identity, Paranoia, and the Crisis of the Self. Well over 70 years ago, Freud wrote, “Where the It was, there the I shall be.” Contemporary esthetic and cultural theory have adopted Freud’s work as a metaphor to express important new ideas: psychology of creativity, of writing, of reading, of conscious-unconscious language, of imaginary vs. real time, sexual difference, dreams, desire, power, self, and the other. In this lecture-discussion seminar, we explore these and other issues of literary theory through a series of thematic “staged interactions.” Interactive texts, drawn from literature, theory, drama, film, and opera, include works by: Sigmund Freud; Jacques Lacan; Jacques Derrida; Shoshana Felman; Edward Said; Thomas Pynchon; Ishmael Reed; Robert Louis Stevenson; Patricia Highsmith; Oscar Wilde; David Mamet; Tennessee Williams; Georg Büchner; Alfred Hitchcock; Howard Zieff; Fritz Lang; Alban Berg, Richard Strauss.

755 – Seminar: Studies in Victorian Literature

2016-2017 Bulletin: Examination of topics in English literature of the Victorian period. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated as topics vary. PrerequisiteENG 741 (maybe taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Summer Star | Detailed InformationVictorian Poetry 

756 – Seminar: 20th Century English Literature

2016-2017 Bulletin: Examination of topics in 20th c. English literature. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated as topics vary. PrerequisiteENG 741 (maybe taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Loretta Stec | Detailed Information: Some scholars in modernist studies have shifted the focus of this field from “Men of 1914” to “Women of 1928.”  Taking this revision as our starting point, we will read works by Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot, Djuna Barnes, Virginia Woolf, Radclyffe Hall, Rebecca West, Nella Larsen, D.H. Lawrence and others with accompanying theoretical and critical works.

760 – Seminar: Studies in American Literature, 1600-1899

2016-2017 Bulletin: Examination of topics in American literature written between 1600-1899. Topic to be specified in Class Schedule. May be repeated as topics vary. PrerequisiteENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Section 01 Emily Dickinson – Margaret Schoerke | Detailed Information: Along with reading around half of Emily  Dickinson's poems and puzzling over their radical experimentation, we will chart the course of response to her work. In particular, we will discuss the editing history, the genesis and persistence of "the Dickinson myth," Dickinson and the American Renaissance, and commentary by various schools of criticism. Finally, we will also consider Dickinson's poetry in the context of work by other nineteenth century American women poets.

Section 02 Palestine and the American Imagination: Ideolgy and Literature – Beverley Voloshin | Detailed Information: This seminar is a critical examination of ideas about Palestine in American religious and national thought and the ways these ideas are expressed in as well as interrogated in works of American literature.

We begin with a few key Puritan texts from the seventeenth century, about the colonists of New England as a second Israel with a covenant with God and on an errand into the wilderness, as a redeemer nation, and as a city on a hill and a light unto the nations--and scholarship on how these tropes have constituted an American ideology. We trace the transformations of this ideology in the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in the strong millennialist strand in American Protestantism that not only pictured the restoration of the Jews to Palestine (frequently called the Holy Land) as preparation for the second coming of Jesus, but also proposed to aid this restoration. This Protestant Zionism preceded Jewish Zionism. The 19th century was also the period of the decline of the Ottoman Empire and of the Eastern Question, when the major powers—England, France, and Russia—took a strategic interest in the eastern Mediterranean. Americans also turned their gaze to Palestine and projected ideas onto it. A number of American and British travel narratives were written about Palestine and circulated widely in the US. Visual images were also important bearers of meaning—book illustrations, panoramas, paintings, prints, and after mid century, photographs and stereographs. We will use the Sutro Library on our campus, which holds some of the major works in this corpus, and other library resources, and then turn to the more literary treatments, including selections from Twain's Innocents Abroad and Tom Sawyer Abroad, Melville's Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land, Lew Wallace’s best-selling Ben Hur, and less-known works by women authors.

Because American imaginings of Palestine so often lacked engagement with contemporary Palestinians and because some of what we are tracing, together with other historical developments, led in the 20th century to the dispossession of Palestinians, we will also include selections from Said’s The Question of Palestine.

763 – Contemporary American Short Fiction

2016-2017 Bulletin: Advanced study of the major fiction writers, post-World War II era to the present. The contemporary short story in the United States. PrerequisiteENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Michael Krasny | Detailed Information: The course covers a range of short fiction from the contemporary period in American letters.  The texts include THE CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SHORT STORY edited by B. Minh Nguyen and Porter Shreve (Pearson/Longmann) and AMERICAN SHORT STORIES SINCE 1945 edited by John G. Parks (Oxford University Press).  Course requirements are three essays of three to five pages on a topic of your choice . These should be well-focused examinations of a question or position or problem .  You will need to hone in on an analysis of any one of the stories on the course syllabus. You will also be responsible for a presentation on any one of the stories included on the syllabus and a ten page critical review/assessment of a volume of short stories selected with the approval of the professor due by semester’s end.

770 – Seminar: The Novel

2016-2017 Bulletin: A major literary problem in the genre. PrerequisiteENG 741 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Kathleen De Guzman | Detailed InformationThis graduate seminar introduces students to geographical frameworks for studying the novel beyond the boundaries of the nation. How do frameworks such as the global south, the planetary, and the archipelagic productively re-map our understanding of literary cultures, histories, and exchanges? Novels studied may include Erna Brodber’s Louisiana, William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom, and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea. 

803 – Teaching Practicum: Literature

2016-2017 Bulletin: Pedagogical issues in the teaching of literature by assisting professors in conducting large lecture courses. May be repeated for a total of 6 units. Prerequisite: by application only; contact English Department or see English Department website for details.

Section 01 – William Christmas | Detailed Information: Students will assist with the teaching of a large lecture course. Students will meet with the class instructor outside the class on an ongoing basis throughout the semester to discuss pedagogical issues and course logistics. Students will also learn pedagogical skills through professor-led workshops, observation of professors in class, and supervised practice of a variety of pedagogical tasks. Under the direct guidance of a professor, students will have the opportunity to learn about and/or gain experience in:

  • Leading breakout discussion sessions
  • Leading a class discussion
  • Giving a class lecture
  • Assessing undergraduate writing and student progress by practicing evaluating quizzes, papers, and/or exams*
  • Advising undergraduates by holding office hours with undergraduates outside of class

 

TESOL

727 – Linguistics Field Methods

2016-2017 Bulletin: Introduction to basic documentary linguistics and linguistic fieldwork through the elicitation and analysis of data from an unfamiliar language; discussion of research ethics and project logistics. PrerequisiteENG 421ENG 424, and ENG 425; priority given to MA Linguistic and MA TESOL student.

Section 01 – Aaron Marks | Detail Information: The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the basics of linguistic field methodology. Students work with a language consultant to discover phonological, morphological and syntactic characteristics of some language unknown to all students in the course. Discussions of conducting empowering and ethical field work will be incorporated into hands-on elicitation techniques. The course is collaborative and team-oriented. Grade based on weekly assignments, participation and final project. Readings will supplement our hands-on language work.

730 – Intro to Graduate Study

2016-2017 Bulletin: Contemporary theories, approaches, theories, and practical procedures in teaching English as a second or foreign language. Principles and current practices in curriculum development, lesson design, skill development, classroom management, and assessment. Prerequisite: Completion of Level One Writing Proficiency requirement; ENG 425 and ENG 426 or equivalents. Restricted to MA TESOL student.

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information: English 730 provides an introduction to the field of teaching English as a second or foreign language.  Focus includes principles and current practices in curriculum development, lesson design, teaching language skills, classroom management, and assessment.  Application of these concepts includes analyses of second/foreign language teaching approaches and their appropriateness for specific teaching contexts.

732 – TESOL – Reading and Writing Skills

2016-2017 Bulletin: The teaching of reading and writing skills to adult non-native speakers of English. Theory and research in ESL/EFL reading and composition, curriculum and lesson planning, teaching techniques and activities, materials selection and development, responding to student work, and assessment. PrerequisiteENG 730.

Section 01 – Robert Kohls | Detailed Information: This course is a graduate seminar in the teaching of reading and writing to second language students. Throughout the semester, we will explore issues related to L2 student needs; the design of reading and writing courses, lessons, and materials; and the role of both teacher and peer feedback in literacy development.

733 – Student Teaching – TESOL

2016-2017 Bulletin: Teaching experience with a faculty supervisor who meets with the student teachers both individually and in groups, observes them, and reads and responds to four written papers. (CR/NC grading only.) PrerequisiteENG 731 and ENG 732.

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information: English 733 (Student Teaching—TESOL) is an opportunity for you to get intensive, hands-on experience working in an ESL class either on campus or off campus.  It is a semester-long course whose primary focus is teaching experience.  Listed below are the specific course requirements, which are designed to provide you with some structure, as well as opportunities for reflection and feedback, as you engage in this important part of your M.A. TESOL education.

734 – Curriculum & Assessment

2016-2017 Bulletin: MA TESOL students develop an original curriculum and assessment procedure for a specific learning context. Assigned readings cover theoretical and practical issues in syllabus design, materials development, and language assessment. PrerequisiteENG 730ENG 731, and ENG 732, or consent of instructor.

Section 01 – Priyanvada Abeywickrama | Detailed Information:

738 – Pragmatics & Oral Skills

2016-2017 Bulletin: Pragmatics research and methods for teaching social interaction skills for TESOL; application of materials appropriate to specific cultural and educational contexts. PrerequisiteENG 425 and 730.

Section 01 – David Olsher | Detailed Information: This seminar is a critical examination of ideas about Palestine in American religious and national thought and the ways these ideas are expressed in as well as interrogated in works of American literature.

We begin with a few key Puritan texts from the seventeenth century, about the colonists of New England as a second Israel with a covenant with God and on an errand into the wilderness, as a redeemer nation, and as a city on a hill and a light unto the nations--and scholarship on how these tropes have constituted an American ideology. We trace the transformations of this ideology in the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in the strong millennialist strand in American Protestantism that not only pictured the restoration of the Jews to Palestine (frequently called the Holy Land) as preparation for the second coming of Jesus, but also proposed to aid this restoration. This Protestant Zionism preceded Jewish Zionism. The 19th century was also the period of the decline of the Ottoman Empire and of the Eastern Question, when the major powers—England, France, and Russia—took a strategic interest in the eastern Mediterranean. Americans also turned their gaze to Palestine and projected ideas onto it. A number of American and British travel narratives were written about Palestine and circulated widely in the US. Visual images were also important bearers of meaning—book illustrations, panoramas, paintings, prints, and after mid century, photographs and stereographs. We will use the Sutro Library on our campus, which holds some of the major works in this corpus, and other library resources, and then turn to the more literary treatments, including selections from Twain's Innocents Abroad and Tom Sawyer Abroad, Melville's Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land, Lew Wallace’s best-selling Ben Hur, and less-known works by women authors.

Because American imaginings of Palestine so often lacked engagement with contemporary Palestinians and because some of what we are tracing, together with other historical developments, led in the 20th century to the dispossession of Palestinians, we will also include selections from Said’s The Question of Palestine.

891 – Integrative Seminar: TESOL

2016-2017 Bulletin: Major issues in teaching English to speakers of other languages. For Master of Arts candidates in English with Concentration in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. (CR/NC grading only) Prerequisite: Final semester in M.A. program.

Section 01 – Maricel Santos | Detailed Information: Synthesis of academic and practical components of M.A.TESOL course work while compiling a comprehensive portfolio of graduate work; delivery of a professional presentation at the MATESOL conference.